Learning through Engagement

Myriad of opportunities available for HTM students

By SUE ELLEN ROSS
BRIDGE Editor

Those enrolled in Purdue Calumet’s hospitality and tourism management (HTM) program will come away with a multifaceted set of skills, as they learn management, leadership and other required specifics in regard to their degree objective.

Students and graduates also have an opportunity to take their education far beyond hands-on experience. In addition to texts, lectures, guest educators and guest chefs and lab work, HTM students run their own restaurant and also take advantage of unique field trips for class credit.

Unique chemistry experience

Learning about certain foods and their chemical make-up — and how they interact during the food preparation process — such as the melting of various types of cheeses, is one of the components of a new chemistry class begun last year.

Becoming aware of ingredients in different dishes and what this means regarding to ‘putting it all together’ is the focus of the lab portion of this class.

Restaurant on Campus

Located in the HTM Building on the south end of campus, the cutting-edge dine in eatery offers lunch and dinner on Wednesdays, open to both the Purdue Calumet community and the public.

The menu reflects unique food items during lunch hour and also a four-course meal at dinnertime. Students plan the menu, shop for the food, cook the lunch and dinner items, serve customers, staff the cash register and clean up – in short, managing all aspects of a restaurant.

May cruise

During this spring’s May-mester, the class, ‘”HTM 385 Educational Study Cruise”, offers students the opportunity to observe behind-the-scenes preparation of a successful cruise ship adventure during the five-day, three-credit course.

The five-day cruise will find each student shadowing a ship employee. The students also will journal their experiences for discussion when back in the classroom.

In addition, students will observe the various departments of the ship, how they are managed and their relation to each other. Tours of the kitchen and specifics of food delivery and related tasks also are on the agenda.

In addition to educational benefits that will be gained, personal benefits, such as independence, also are on the plus side of taking this class, according to Geralyn Farley, HTM associate professor and program coordinator.

“The students will get to know their classmate like they can’t in any other class,” she said. “They also will be exposed to other cultures and cuisines, as well as learn about formal dinners – how to dress, proper etiquette, etc.”