Data Snapshot Volume Two August 2012

Download Data Snapshot Volume II (PDF)

man holding a camera - Data Snapshot logo

The Office of Institutional Research and Assessment (OIRA) produces “Data Snapshots” to provide the Purdue University Calumet community with a brief report on a variety of topics. For additional data resources, please explore other sections of our Web site.

What Purdue University Calumet Students Say

The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) collects information annually from samples of first-year and senior student about the nature and quality of their undergraduate experience. Purdue University Calumet participated most recently in 2007 and 2010 by mailing paper forms to a randomly-selected sample of our freshmen and seniors. The instructions delivered with the survey forms provided students the option of submitting their survey responses on the NSSE web site instead of returning the paper form.

Results from NSSE can provide prospective student with insights into how they might learn and develop at a given college; and can be used by the institution to determine student satisfaction with programs and services, make improvements to the curriculum, and understand students’ perception of the value of their college experience.

Are We Improving? THE “BIG 5″ CATEGORIES

How challenging is your institution’s intellectual and creative work?

Level of Academic Challenge
Year in School 2007 2010 Status
First-Year 51% 52% Green arrow indicating increase
Senior 55% 54% red arrow indicating a decrease

Are your students actively involved in their learning, individually and working with others?

Active and Collaborative Learning
Year in School 2007 2010 Status
First-Year 41% 45% Green arrow indicating increase
Senior 50% 49% red arrow indicating a decrease

Do your students work with faculty members inside and outside the classroom?

Student-Faculty Interaction
Year in School 2007 2010 Status
First-Year 31% 32% Green arrow indicating increase
Senior 35% 37% Green arrow indicating increase

Do your students take advantage of complementary learning opportunities?

Enriching Educational Experiences
Year in School 2007 2010 Status
First-Year 24% 24% yellow arrow indicating no change in status
Senior 32% 33% Green arrow indicating increase

Do your students feel the institution is committed to their success?

Supportive Campus Environment
Year in School 2007 2010 Status
First-Year 54% 61% Green arrow indicating increase
Senior 57% 58% Green arrow indicating increase

Peer Institutions:

Girl with books

  • Southern Illinois University – Edwardsville (SIUE)
  • University of Southern Indiana (USI)
  • William Paterson University of New Jersey (WPUNJ)
  • University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW)
  • University of Central Oklahoma (UCO)
  • University of Wisconsin – Platteville (UWP)
  • The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC)
  • Kean University*
  • Kennesaw State University (KSU)
  • University of Michigan Dearborn*

*Data unavailable

How Does Purdue University Calumet Compare?

  • Group Learning Experiences
  • Active Learning Experiences
  • Institutional Commitment To Student Learning And Success
  • Student Interaction With Campus Faculty And Staff
  • Experiences With Diverse Groups Of People And Ideas
  • Student Satisfaction

Key Area Improvements between 2007 and 2012*

  • 1b: Increase from 55% to 59%
  • 2d: Increase from 35% to 44%
  • 3b: Increase from 54% to 58%
  • 4a: Increase from 58% to 63%;
  • 4b: Increase from 79% to 84%
  • 4d: Increase from 65% to 70%
  • 5a: Increase from 54% to 62%;
  • 5c: Increase from 51% to 61%

*Based on responses provided by Purdue Calumet seniors

Peer Comparison: Selected Results

1. Group Learning Experiences
Survey Statement PUC SIUE USI WPUNJ UNCW UCO UWP UTC KSU
a. seniors worked with classmates on assignments outside of class. 95% 95% 87% 89% 95% 93% 98% 91% 94%
b. seniors tutored or taught other students 59% 55% 52% 49% 59% 46% 64% 54% 56%
c. seniors spent at least 6 hours per week participating in co-curricular activities such as student organizations and intramural sports 9% 19% 19% 17% 35% 15% 34% 21% 15%
2. Active Learning Experiences
Survey Statement PUC SIUE USI WPUNJ UNCW UCO UWP UTC KSU
a. seniors spent at least 6 hours per week preparing for class 77% 79% 82% 78% 85% 81% 84% 82% 83%
b. seniors worked on a research project with a faculty member 16% 19% 18% 16% 27% 12% 17% 16% 13%
c. seniors participated in an internship, practicum, or field experience 42% 48% 52% 41% 63% 45% 67% 45% 45%
d. seniors participated in community service or volunteer work 44% 56% 60% 41% 69% 46% 68% 53% 56%
e. seniors participated in study abroad 6% 6% 5% 6% 22% 7% 10% 9% 13%
f. seniors made at least one class presentation last year 94% 97% 91% 97% 97% 93% 97% 93% 95%
3. Institutional Commitment to Student Learning and Success
Survey Statement PUC SIUE USI WPUNJ UNCW UCO UWP UTC KSU
a. seniors believe this institution provides support for student success 92% 95% 95% 94% 98% 98% 97% 92% 95%
b. seniors rated the quality of academic advising at this institution as good or excellent 62% 57% 75% 61% 75% 72% 78% 64% 66%
c. seniors reported that this institutione provided help in coping with work, family and other non-academic responsibilities 58% 56% 63% 58% 72% 70% 63% 56% 58%
d. seniors reported working harder than they thought they could to meet an instructor’s standards or expectations 92% 94% 94% 97% 94% 96% 93% 92% 94%
4 Student Interaction with Campus Faculty and Staff
Survey Statement PUC SIUE USI WPUNJ UNCW UCO UWP UTC KSU
a. seniors believed that the campus staff were helpful, considerate, or flexible 63% 49% 62% 45% 59% 58% 57% 44% 54%
b. seniors believed that faculty are available, helpful, or sympathetic 84% 77% 86% 74% 87% 75% 82% 77% 79%
c. seniors reported that faculty members provided prompt feedback on their academic performance 95% 95% 95% 95% 97% 96% 96% 94% 95%
d. seniors discussed readings or ideas with faculty members outside of class 70% 69% 70% 70% 76% 70% 75% 73% 69%
5 Experiences with Diverse Groups of People and Ideas
Survey Statement PUC SIUE USI WPUNJ UNCW UCO UWP UTC KSU
a. seniors reported that they often tried to understand someone else’s point of view 62% 60% 65% 64% 71% 68% 53% 70% 69%
b. seniors reported their experience at this institution contributed to their understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds 83% 83% 87% 91% 81% 90% 85% 80% 85%
c. seniors often had serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity 61% 50% 40% 62% 52% 57% 25% 56% 62%
6 Student Satisfaction
Survey Statement PUC SIUE USI WPUNJ UNCW UCO UWP UTC KSU
a. seniors would attend this institution if they started over again 82% 77% 83% 72% 86% 89% 86% 76% 84%
b. seniors rated their entire educational experience as good or excellent 88% 81% 87% 74% 89% 91% 90% 79% 87%
c. seniors reported that other students were friendly or supportive 78% 84% 80% 79% 86% 82% 87% 78% 91%

The Importance of Experiential Learning

In April 2007, the Faculty Senate created a new graduation requirement integrating experiential learning courses a part of the curriculum. Three years after this graduation requirement (NSSE 20120), Purdue Calumet freshmen still report limited opportunities in this area, but Purdue Calumet seniors have made progress.diagram with Experiential Learning at the center.

Purdue Calumet seniors are on par with seniors from other urban universities who report experiential learning internships, etc., and only slightly behind seniors reporting these experiences from all 595 universities participating in NSSE. (Forty-two percent of Purdue Calumet seniors have had an experiential learning experience compared to 50% of seniors at all NSSE institutions).

Undergraduate research has also shown improvement with 16% of Purdue Calumet seniors reporting research engagement with a faculty member outside of course or program requirements compared to 17% at urban institutions and 19% at all NSSE institutions.

In 2011 – 2012, 2,109 Purdue Calumet students were engaged in some type of experiential learning. During that same year, 271 sections of experiential learning were offered reflecting 38 different subject areas.

Structured interviews with Purdue Calumet faculty revealed multiple examples of how students engage with faculty and the community in applying classroom theory to real-world problems.

Here are some examples:

  • Senior nursing students work in teams to research a problem in the health care industry and implement solutions;
  • Junior and senior civil engineering students provide design and consulting help to local municipalities on flood abatement;
  • Public relations majors conduct communications audits for local companies;
  • Mechatronics majors prepare for senior-level internships by spending one semester tackling industry projects under the guidance of a faculty member;
  • Management majors study leadership in action by working in tandem with directors of non-profit organizations to tackle community-based problems;
  • Freshmen in basic English composition courses develop community-based writing projects including Webzines, podcast script writing, children book creation, and promotional press releases;
  • Entrepreneurship students in a small business consulting class support clients through development of business and marketing plans.

Contributor: Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Quality Programs.