Archives

Friday, October 23rd, 2009 - 1:04 pm

News and Notes Header

Record enrollment of 10,133 this fall

A record number of students is attending Purdue University Calumet this fall.

Enrollment of 10,133 tops the previous high mark of 9,607 students in 2007. This year’s total also represents a 9 percent increase over last year’s count of 9,325.

Purdue Calumet’s enrollment includes substantial increases among graduate students (1,128 total, up 16 percent/156 students) and international students (557 total, up 22 percent/100 students). Also included in the total are 315 dual credit, Crown Point High School students, who are enrolled in specific Purdue Calumet classes for high school and university credit.

Due to limited course availability within traditional, new student class sections, Purdue Calumet officials, for the first time in university history, closed admission prior to the start of the fall semester.

Read more



2nd student housing facility opens on campus

Purdue Calumet’s recently-opened, second student housing facility, University Village 2, provides apartment suite accommodations for 369 students.

Purdue Calumet’s recently-opened, second student housing facility, University Village 2, provides apartment suite accommodations for 369 students.

Nearly four years after becoming a residential campus, Purdue University Calumet opened its second student housing facility this fall. A dedication took place Aug. 12.

The $16 million, four-story, University Village 2 offers living space for 369 students. The structure is located immediately east of the original University Village. The latter accommodates 376 students. The fall semester opened with collective occupancy of 79 percent in both facilities.

Read more









‘The Campaign for Students’ in support of scholarships begins

The economy is attempting to recover, but students desiring a college education continue to be in need. So Purdue University Calumet has introduced The Campaign for Students.

This end-of-the-year drive is focusing on increased private support for student scholarships at a time when the need is especially pronounced.

“Many Purdue Calumet students burn the candle at both ends, working an extraordinary number of hours at jobs to support their education,” Purdue Calumet Chancellor Howard Cohen said. “Research shows that a vibrant scholarship program that reduces work hours improves academic performance.”

Vice Chancellor for Advancement Daniel Hendricks said, “Many individuals direct end of the year gifts to philanthropic causes. Through this campaign, we want to draw attention to the fact that there are numerous Purdue Calumet students who need a little help to realize their dreams.”

A gift of $1,000 or more, according to Hendricks, will purchase a student’s semester textbooks, fund four credit hours of coursework and help pay for car travel to and from campus. Such a gift also affords donors the opportunity to name the scholarship.

“Even modest gifts will help our students, who are attending Purdue Calumet in record numbers, make important progress toward their goal of earning a Purdue degree,” Cohen said.

Gifts can be made on line at www.calumet.purdue.edu/thecampaignforstudents or mailed to Purdue Calumet’s Office of Advancement at 2200 169th St., Hammond, IN 46323-2094. Other information can be obtained by phoning 219/989-2323 or 800/HI-PURDUE, ext. 2323.



Purdue Calumet playing key role in development of Hammond charter school

Through its Center for Science and Technology Education, Purdue Calumet is developing curriculum and assuming responsibility for faculty and staff development of Hammond’s pending charter school, the Hammond Academy for Science and Technology. The public school, which will be available to Indiana residents, is expected to open next fall for 320 sixth through ninth grade students

Read more in The Next Level



Grants and contracts revenue increases 80%

Support for grants and contracts awarded to Purdue Calumet during the 2008-09 fiscal year increased 80 percent over the previous year and 111 percent over the 2006-07 amount, the university’s Office of Research and Professional Development announced.

Purdue Calumet generated $10,911,241 last fiscal year from federal, state, private industrial and private foundation sources, compared to $6,047,271 in 2007-08. Most of the support awarded during 2008-09 came in the form of federal grants. In fact, those dollars—

$8,308,425—represent a 205 percent increase over federal grant support received during 2007-08.

“Through faculty expertise and student involvement, this revenue provides opportunities to support applied research that benefits our region,” Chancellor Howard Cohen said. “In times of tight budgets, such external funding has become an important source of revenue.”

About 10 percent of Purdue Calumet’s operating budget comes from externally-funded grants and contracts. The Office of Research and Professional Development is responsible for securing, administering and managing external funding for faculty research, scholarship and professional development.



‘Smoke-Free’ campus policy implemented

Purdue Calumet implemented a smoke-free campus policy this fall semester.

Previously, smoking was prohibited in all Purdue Calumet buildings, but permitted in designated outdoor areas near university buildings. The new policy prohibits smoking in all outdoor areas on campus, university vehicles, and other off-campus property owned or operated by Purdue Calumet, including the Academic Learning Center in Merrillville.

Read more



South Korean technical college graduates coming to campus

Purdue Calumet has established agreements to provide instruction in business/management and engineering to students of a South Korean technical college.

According to one agreement, graduates of Yeungjin College, a two-year, private technical institution located in the city of Daegu, can enroll in Purdue Calumet’s School of Management and complete the remaining two years of a baccalaureate degree while majoring in accounting, finance, business economics, marketing, human resources, entrepreneurship, retailing or equine management.

Another agreement provides an opportunity for Yeungjin graduates to complete a baccalaureate degree in mechanical or electrical engineering at Purdue Calumet. Students who record grades of “B” or higher will be eligible to enroll in Purdue Calumet’s engineering master’s degree program.

Read more



Students . . .

700+ degrees awarded to spring, summer graduates

Purdue Calumet graduates earned 602 degrees last spring and 114 during the summer.

According to figures released by the university’s Office of the Registrar, spring graduates claimed 121 master’s degrees, 401 baccalaureate degrees and 80 associate degrees. Summer graduates achieved 58 master’s degrees, 47 bachelor’s degrees and nine associate degrees.

More than 41,700 degrees have been awarded at Purdue Calumet.



Pre-pharmacy students excelling

While Purdue University’s highly competitive and internationally respected School of Pharmacy attracted more than 1,100 applicants for just 160 openings last year, Purdue Calumet is pleased that 58 percent of students from its pre-pharmacy program earned acceptance into the School. The acceptance rate is the highest Purdue Calumet pre-pharmacy students have experienced.

“It reflects the strength of our pre-pharmacy curriculum and the highly talented students who are part of our program,” Pre-Pharmacy Academic Advisor and Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Radmila Sarac said.

There are 60 students enrolled in Purdue Calumet’s pre-pharmacy program. Within its Dept. of Biological Sciences, Purdue Calumet also offers pre-professional programs in pre-dentistry, pre-medicine, pre-occupational therapy, pre-optometry, pre-physical therapy, and pre-veterinary science and medicine.



Mechatronics students place 1st in competition

A team of Purdue Calumet mechatronics engineering technology students placed first in a national packaging contest, Oct. 6, held during the PACK Expo in Las Vegas.

After a Purdue Calumet student mechatronics team, co-advised by Rickerson (from left) and comprised of Agarwal, Dalka and Beckett, placed first in a national packaging competition Oct. 6 during PACK Expo in Las Vegas…

After a Purdue Calumet student mechatronics team, co-advised by Rickerson (from left) and comprised of Agarwal, Dalka and Beckett, placed first in a national packaging competition Oct. 6 during PACK Expo in Las Vegas…


…Northwest Indiana Congressman Pete Visclosky (middle) came to campus Oct. 12 to learn more about the university’s mechatronics engineering technology program.

…Northwest Indiana Congressman Pete Visclosky (middle) came to campus Oct. 12 to learn more about the university’s mechatronics engineering technology program.

PMMI U, the educational arm of PACK Expo organizer Packaging Machinery Manufacturers Institute introduced the first-ever competition, which required college student teams to address a unique, real-world packaging challenge. The challenge? Developing a palletizing system that maximizes speed and minimizes expense to produce and maintain.

The student teams took into account environmental impact, energy consumption, ease of use and cost considerations. Five teams competed.

In placing first, the Purdue Calumet student team of Gautam Agarwal, Kenneth Beckett and George Dalka will share a $4,000 scholarship. Faculty advisors are Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology Masoud Fathizadeh and Mechanical & Manufacturing Laboratory Specialist Rick Rickerson.

Mechatronics engineering technology is a relatively new baccalaureate degree program at Purdue Calumet that integrates mechanical engineering technology, electrical engineering technology, computers and controls relative to designing, installing, maintaining and troubleshooting the complex equipment within the packaging industry.



6 applying $120,000 grant to improve recycling efforts

While one person’s trash may be another’s treasure, six Purdue Calumet students have been busy trying to make a lot of persons’ trash the basis for improved recycling programs.

The students are applying their knowledge of biology, chemistry, engineering and mathematics in response to a $120,000 grant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Harvey Abramowitz received from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management to study the characterization of municipal solid waste.

By sorting through literally tons of solid waste at various Indiana landfill sites, the students, under Abramowitz’ direction, plan to generate a report by year’s end that they hope will help increase Indiana’s recycling rate.

Read more



Faculty/Staff . . .


3 receive Outstanding Faculty Awards

Receiving Purdue Calumet’s Outstanding Faculty Awards for the 2008-09 academic year were: Professor of Electrical Engineering David Kozel (Outstanding Teacher), Professor of Biological Sciences Charles Tseng (Outstanding Faculty Scholar) and Professor of Mechanical Engineering Harvey Abramowitz of Chicago.

Read more



Chinese university honors Chancellor Cohen

Chancellor Howard Cohen returned from a 12-day, late spring trip to China that generated several partnerships with international universities and an honorary professorship.

Cohen; his wife, Patricia; and Purdue Calumet Professor/Mechanical Engineering Department Head Chen Zhou, a native of Changsha City, Hunan Province, visited four universities: Central South University, Sichuan University, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, and North China Electric Power University.

The trip served to establish faculty research and student exchange opportunities between Purdue Calumet and the Chinese universities, as well as advance Purdue Calumet’s “English Training in Engineering” program. The program attracts to the Hammond campus Chinese engineering students in their final year of undergraduate study who desire to strengthen their English literacy skills as they complete their engineering course work.

Read more



25-year fundraising professional appointed VC of Advancement

Daniel Hendricks - Vice Chancellor for AdvancementAn accomplished, 25-year fundraising professional and administrator in higher education and other not-for-profit settings has been appointed Vice Chancellor for Advancement at Purdue University Calumet.

Evansville native Daniel L. Hendricks joined the Purdue Calumet senior leadership team Aug. 3. Previously Vice President for Advancement and Public Services at Western Illinois University (WIU) and Executive Officer of the WIU Foundation, he oversees Purdue Calumet’s development, alumni, and marketing/university relations units.

Read more



OBITS

Professor Emeritus, Computing Educator John Maniotes

John Maniotes, a retired, 38-year faculty member; Purdue Calumet’s first department head in computing technology; author of numerous textbooks; and long time Information Technology consultant, died May 13 following an illness. He was 73. After joining the Purdue Calumet faculty in 1963, Maniotes became the university’s first head of what was then called the Computing Technology Department, serving in that capacity until 1975. His era and expertise spanned from that of punch cards and IBM 1620 computers to the present. Donations in his name may be made to the Sam and John Maniotes Scholarship at Purdue Calumet through the Office of Advancement and its Giving to Purdue Calumet link. http://www.calumet.purdue.edu/giving/. For more information, phone 219/989-2323 or 800/HI-PURDUE, ext. 2323.

Professor Emeritus, Information Systems & Computer Programming James Quasney

James (Jim) Quasney, a 26-year faculty member (1970-96) and department head, died Aug. 23. Also an Information Technology consultant and prolific writer, he authored/co-authored more than 50 textbooks. After retiring from Purdue Calumet, he worked as a series editor for the Shelly Cashman textbook series

Professor Emeritus, Chemistry Richard Fryer

Richard (Dick) Fryer, who made a midlife career change to teach chemistry at Purdue Calumet (1960-88) after a successful career in industry as a chemist and metallurgist, died Aug. 29. He was 92. A committed environmentalist and longtime member of the Sierra Club, he also wrote poetry and several books on various topics.