About PDS

 Introduction

 Mission

 Function

 Partner Responsibilities

 Becoming a PDS Partner or Associate site

 School benefits from the PDS partnership

 The university benefits from the PDS partnerships

 Education courses utilizing PDS partner and associate sites


 Introduction

The creation of Professional Development School (PDS) partnerships provides a unique opportunity for educators from the university and school sites to learn from each other and share professional expertise. It is the hope of the School of Education at Purdue University Calumet (PUC) to foster these collaborative partnerships and, while doing so, increase the effectiveness of the teacher education programs. The role of school-based educators is paramount to the success of this collaboration. Activities of the PUC/Northwest Indiana PDS partnerships are coordinated by a Steering Committee. Members of this Committee represent each of the schools and/or districts participating in PDS. University faculty also serves on the Committee. The PDS Steering Committee sets policy for the partnerships and is open to any school or district interested in the mission of this collaboration. The PDS Mission Statement was formally adopted by the Steering Committee in 1996, and emphasizes the interlocking themes of Quality, Diversity, and Collaboration. In 2001, the Steering Committee worked collaboratively with the PUC faculty to establish a conceptual framework.


 Mission

The Professional Development School (PDS) Partnership between Purdue University Calumet and our respective host school(s) is a collaborative effort. Our mission is to: (1) improve P-12 student achievement; (2) facilitate teacher education candidates’ understanding of theory and practice by providing candidates with learning opportunities in P-12 classroom settings; (3) support professional development efforts of in-service teachers; (4) improve student learning; (5) research the problems of educational practice. The partnership is dedicated to the academic success of P-12 learners.
In achieving the goals of diversity, quality, and collaboration, the PDS mission reflects the following beliefs:

  • The professional expertise of all participants, across all settings, is valued.
  • All participants, and their students, are viewed as life-long learners.
  • All participants remain current in their knowledge of best quality practices.
  • All participants reflectively consider their own practices and their effectiveness in meeting the diverse needs of learners.
  • School and university leaders (i.e., administrators) value the strengths of individual educators and actively promote reform to meet students’ diverse needs.
  • Diverse instructional styles are encouraged to effectively meet individual needs.
    Quality instructional practices are consistently demonstrated within PDS schools.
  • Participating educators actively support and mentor teacher candidates.
  • Participating educators are open to new ideas and instructional strategies.
  • Participating educators are willing to share individual areas of expertise with teacher candidates and other educators.
  • Teacher candidates exhibit PUC academic standards while in PDS classrooms.
  • Teacher candidates have opportunities to observe and teach in multiple, diverse settings as part of their PDS experiences.
  • University educators support and promote the expertise of classroom educators by actively involving these participants in pre-service course experiences.
  • University educators directly support educational reform in the schools to which the teacher candidates are assigned.
  • University educators provide feedback to support reform occurring at any PDS site.
  • When determining scheduling for pre-service field experiences, the beliefs and best practices of the school sites will be of primary importance.
  • University and classroom educators collaboratively develop pre-service programs.
  • Opportunities for collaborative learning experiences are encouraged across educational settings (e.g., classroom, university, and pre-service participants).
  • PDS Steering Committee members or their representatives regularly attend PDS meetings and are supportive of other PDS activities.

 Vision Statement

The Purdue University Calumet Professional Development School (PDS) initiative is to support a cooperative mission of reform in both pre-service (university) and in-service (school) educators. This vision has three central goals: diversity, quality, and collaboration. PDS members recognize the value of diversity in individual cultures, instructional styles, and unique needs as life-long learners. The quality of instructional practices and reform efforts is also recognized as essential in effectively meeting diverse needs. In order to develop best quality practices and to actualize reform across educational settings, collaboration among all participants is paramount to the PDS vision.


 Function of the PDS partnership

Activities adopted by the PDS partners reflect the goals identified in the Mission A primary function of the PDS partnerships is to assist in the coordination of field placements for teacher education methods courses (course overviews are provided in this handbook). This function includes three equally balanced components: (1) extended field placements for teacher candidates, (2) leadership opportunities for classroom teachers, and (3) professional development support provided by university faculty. For example, teacher candidates benefit from having extended opportunities to work directly with children as part of their methods coursework; in turn, they share ideas with their Host Teachers. The Host Teachers, or other staff volunteers, share their expertise by leading on-site seminars for the teacher candidates. University faculty provides support to the school related to course content or in other areas selected by the school staff. Future activities of the PDS partnerships will continue to align school reform with pre-service education programs, while addressing state and national education initiatives.

Paramount to the PDS initiatives, and related methods courses, is the implementation of the School of Education’s Teacher Education standards. These standards are reflective of INTASC, Indiana Professional Standards Board, and national content standards. At the conclusion of their experiences at Purdue Calumet, teacher candidates are expected to demonstrate proficiency in regard to the knowledge, dispositions, and performances for each of the nine standards.


 Partner Responsibilities

*Points of Agreement
Purdue University Calumet and School agree to collaborate through the Northwest Indiana/Purdue University Calumet Professional Development School (PDS) initiative. In addition to the Purdue University Calumet’s School of Education mission statement of constructing knowledge, developing practice, and fostering relationships, this partnership will reflect the PDS mission and, through the goals of quality, diversity, and collaboration, will include activities for pre-service teacher education, the continuing education of school and university educators, avenues for professional sharing, and active support of all students’ learning.


Participant Roles and Responsibilities

*Chair responsibilities
The Chair of the PDS Committee will serve a three year appointment to be appointed by the Department Head and approved by a majority of the PDS Committee. The chair will create agenda for PDS Steering Committee, schedule and organize PDS Steering Committee events, provide leadership support in all school/university partnerships, provide feedback to the School of Education regarding the teacher education programs, and actively support the Mission Statement adopted by the PDS Steering Committee.
The Chair of PDS has the following responsibilities:

  • Schedule meetings each semester to share PDS information and feedback with area administrators and interested participants.
  • Share clear expectations of the PDS program with PUC faculty, methods instructors, and school-based participants.
  • Coordinate the scheduling of professional development with PDS schools.

*The PDS Steering Committee
The primary responsibility of the University Instructor is to insure that teacher candidates have the knowledge foundation needed in order to effectively teach within the classroom. In most methods courses, the University Instructor meets with the teacher candidates once each week to address issues specific to the content area of the methods course. The University Instructor then coordinates the supervision of the teacher candidates within the field experiences (up to three schools may be selected as field sites for a particular course). A graduate aide may assist in this supervision. In some course sections, the University Instructor works collaboratively with a Clinical Instructor (a site-based classroom teacher) to team-teach the course and develop assignments. Additionally, the University Instructor provides the school with professional support in areas related to the methods course content. The responsibilities of the University Instructor include the following:

  • Provide PUC teacher candidates with foundations in instruction.
  • Work collaboratively with school staff to place teacher candidates.
  • Assist in the supervision of teacher candidates.
  • Clearly share course expectations with the school staff.
  • Provide professional development support, as determined by school staff and administration.

Seek avenues for professional collaboration with site-based teachers.

*The PUC Methods Instructors
The primary responsibility of the University Instructor is to insure that teacher candidates have the knowledge foundation needed in order to effectively teach within the classroom. In most methods courses, the University Instructor meets with the teacher candidates once each week to address issues specific to the content area of the methods course. The University Instructor then coordinates the supervision of the teacher candidates within the field experiences (up to three schools may be selected as field sites for a particular course). A graduate aide may assist in this supervision. In some course sections, the University Instructor works collaboratively with a Clinical Instructor (a site-based classroom teacher) to team-teach the course and develop assignments. Additionally, the University Instructor provides the school with professional support in areas related to the methods course content. The responsibilities of the University Instructor include the following:

  • Provide PUC teacher candidates with foundations in instruction.
  • Work collaboratively with school staff to place teacher candidates.
  • Assist in the supervision of teacher candidates.
  • Clearly share course expectations with the school staff.
  • Provide professional development support, as determined by school staff and administration.
  • Seek avenues for professional collaboration with site-based teachers.


*The Host Teachers
Host Teachers provide invaluable support to the PDS partnership by opening up their classrooms to teacher candidates. Within most methods courses, teacher candidates from PUC are paired and often team-teach lessons they have developed. Teacher candidates are encouraged to communicate with the Host Teachers on a regular basis so that their instruction is compatible with the classroom curriculum. The responsibilities of the Host Teachers include the following:

  • Provide time for teacher candidates to observe and work with children.
  • Provide active feedback to and support of the teacher candidates.
  • Provide feedback and input about program and partnership.
  • Secure permission to video and audio record interactions between students and teacher candidates engaging in pedagogical approaches

*The School Principal
The school principal provides the leadership to successfully implement the PDS initiative in the partner school. The principal facilitates the identification of host teachers, placement of teacher candidates, and coordination of professional development experiences within the school. The responsibilities of the School Principal include the following:

  • Provide active support of the partnership program and its participants.
  • Attend PDS meetings scheduled by the Chair.


*The Teacher Candidates
Prior to beginning their methods courses, teacher candidates have successfully completed education foundations courses and demonstrated that they are prepared to begin their field experiences. While some have had extensive classroom experiences (e.g., substitute teaching, volunteering, or aide positions), many do not yet have this prior knowledge. The methods field experiences, therefore, are invaluable in supporting the teacher candidates’ professional growth. Within most of the methods courses, the teacher candidates are required to be in the host classroom for a minimum of two hours per course each visit. The responsibilities of the teacher candidates include the following:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in and understanding of the School of Education Teacher Education Standards through their performances, knowledge, and dispositions in the classroom.
  • Seek information regarding course content and suggested instructional strategies from the Host Teacher.
  • Plan classroom visits and teaching experiences that best fit the host teacher’s schedule and which are within the time restrictions of the course.
  • Develop instructional lesson plans appropriate for the pupils, compatible with the Host Teacher’s curriculum, and adaptive to all students’ needs.
  • Utilize a variety of instructional strategies and resources, including technology.
  • Utilize a variety of grouping strategies (e.g., small group, whole class).
  • Remain open to constructive criticism and feedback from the Host Teacher, University Instructor, and graduate aide.
  • Demonstrate professionalism in regard to dress, rapport with students, communication with teachers and parents, and attitude.

 Becoming a PDS Partner

Any school/district in the northwest Indiana region is welcome to participate in the Purdue Calumet PDS initiative. Participants are expected to support the partnership’s stated Mission, the implementation of best quality instructional practices, professional development of its staff, and development of future teachers. Participants are also expected to provide active input regarding the activities and goals of the partnership. Partner sites are those schools that host teacher candidates during the methods courses. Associate sites host teacher candidates in the pre-methods courses. For additional information, contact Robin Horbovetz (989-2026), to discuss any aspect of the PDS model.

 School benefits from the PDS partnership

The PDS Mission emphasizes the support of reform at all educational levels, particularly within the classroom. Therefore, the PDS model has been developed to assist schools and districts with implementing best practices and expanding the professional development of educators and administrators. Specific benefits for school-based participants include:

  • Extra classroom assistance through teacher candidates’ involvement.
  • Access to new instructional ideas and resources.
  • A variety of professional leadership opportunities.
  • Opportunities to attend and/or present at conferences.
  • Ongoing, site-based professional development.
  • Updates regarding state reforms and policies.
  • Collaborative links to the university.
  • Increased opportunities to pursue grant funding.
  • Positive PR for the school and district.
  • Participation in a PDS-specific graduate course.
  • Invitation to the annual educators’ Celebration.
  • Direct involvement in the preparation of future teachers.

 University benefits from the PDS partnerships

The PDS model was originally established to support school reform while immersing teacher candidates in a variety of course-related field experiences. It was especially important that these future teachers gain experience in a variety of cultural/ethnic settings where best instructional practices were clearly evident. University participants, including teacher candidates, benefit from the PDS partnerships in the following ways:

  • Increased quality in teacher education programs and teacher candidates.
  • Alignment of field experiences to program standards.
  • Varied field experiences in multiple, diverse settings.
  • Exposure to a variety of effective teaching models.
  • Authentic blend of theory and practice.
  • Classroom connections for students and faculty
  • Joint representation on committees and PDS functions.
  • Critical link to accreditation.

What is the function of the PDS partnership?

Activities adopted by the PDS partners reflect the goals identified in the Mission Statement. For example, school and university participants have developed a Speaker Resource Guide, pre-service/in-service education grants, Video Library, and other professional development activities.

A primary function of the PDS partnerships is to assist in the coordination of field placements for teacher education methods courses (course overviews are provided in this handbook). This function includes three equally balanced components: (1) extended field placements for teacher candidates, (2) leadership opportunities for classroom teachers, and (3) professional development support provided by university faculty. For example, teacher candidates benefit from having extended opportunities to work directly with children as part of their methods coursework; in turn, they share ideas with their Host Teachers. The Host Teachers, or other staff volunteers, share their expertise by leading on-site seminars for the teacher candidates. University faculty provides support to the school related to course content or in other areas selected by the school staff. Future activities of the PDS partnerships will continue to align school reform with pre-service education programs, while addressing state and national education initiatives.

Paramount to the PDS initiatives, and related methods courses, is the implementation of the School of Education’s Teacher Education standards. These standards are reflective of INTASC, ACEI, CEC, Indiana Professional Standards Board, and national content standards. At the conclusion of their experiences at Purdue Calumet, teacher candidates are expected to demonstrate proficiency in regard to the knowledge, dispositions, and performances for each of the nine standards.

 Education courses utilizing PDS partner and associate sites

Partner Sites
EDCI 321 Literacy and the Young Child
EDCI 304 Literacy and the Middle Child
EDCI 315 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School
EDCI 316 Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School
EDCI 317 Teaching Science in the Elementary School
EDCI 307 Corrective reading for the Classroom Teacher
EDPS 370 Teaching Students with Diverse Learning Needs
EDCI 346 Teaching Science in the Secondary and Middle School
EDCI 347 Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary and Middle School

Associate Sites
EDPS 285 Diversity in Education
EDCI 355 Teaching and Learning in the K-12 Classroom
EDCI 497 Student Teacher Seminar

Teacher education programs at Purdue University Calumet are continuously being revised in order to immerse future teachers in a variety of field experiences prior to student teaching. Listed below are the elementary courses that currently use PDS sites in conjunction with required field experiences. School and university partners collaborate in the selection of sites for the field based courses. Participants are encouraged to contact course instructors for copies of course syllabi and calendars.
EDCI 304 (Literacy and the Middle Child)
EDCI 304 is a foundations course in reading/literacy, which includes methods and materials for teaching reading to upper elementary school students. Candidates enrolled in this course have been formally admitted to the teacher education programs. Included in the course are strategies for incorporating literature and content area reading into the curriculum; provisions for individual and cultural differences are also stressed. Field experiences include classroom observation and the implementation of lessons in small and whole group settings.
EDCI 307 (Corrective Reading for the Classroom Teacher)
EDCI 307 is an intensive course taken after the teacher candidate has completed EDCI 304 and 321. Through the field experience, the teacher candidate works one-on-one with an elementary student to provide tutoring in the area of literacy. PUC tutors develop their own lesson plans and instructional materials. Informal assessments are also given to identify the child’s strengths and needs as well as to facilitate the lesson planning. Instruction emphasizes authentic uses of trade books, the writing process, student choice, and the contextual use of skills. At the conclusion of the experience, the teacher candidate develops a final report and/or portfolio that overviews the child’s strengths, needs, and instructional recommendations.
EDCI 321 (Literacy and the Young Child)
EDCI 321 explores aspects of child development including early developmental influences and preschool learning and their relevance to literacy. Examines methods and materials appropriate for preschool and beginning literacy. Topics will include the instruction and assessment of students.
EDCI 315 (Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School)
This course provides experiences in developing a mathematics teaching practice that is based on inquiry and problem-solving approaches. Course emphases include children’s mathematical conceptual development, mathematical beliefs and values, classroom norms and mathematical practices, and teacher’s decision-making in action. Field-based assignments include one-on-one interviewing with pupils as well as both small-group and whole-class instruction. This course is taken in conjunction with EDCI 317 (Science).
EDCI 316 (Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School)
Instructional strategies appropriate to teaching elementary Social Studies, social issues relevant to the Social Studies, and the use of thematic instruction provide the emphasis for this course. Through their field experiences, teacher candidates work in pairs or triads to create and implement both small- and whole-group lessons. Team-teaching and observation within the host classroom are also required. Because it is taught in conjunction with EDCI 314, teacher candidates are also expected to link Language Arts strategies with their lesson planning.
EDCI 317 (Teaching of Science in the Elementary School Curriculum)
This course provides experiences in developing skills for teaching Science and fosters an understanding of the content of the Science curriculum. Because the emphasis is on an activity based science curriculum, host schools are selected which currently use this approach or are considering future implementation. Field experiences include opportunities for paired teaching with both small and whole groups of pupils. This course is taken in conjunction with EDCI 315 (Mathematics).
EDPS 370 (Teaching Students with Diverse Learning Needs In K-12 Class)
The course develops a knowledge base and practical strategies that will enable teachers to help every student succeed-including students with disabilities, those with diverse cultural backgrounds, students with limited English proficiency, students who are considered at risk for academic failure, and those who are gifted and talented. Topics include planning and grouping strategies, classroom management, collaboration skills, curriculum adaptations, teaching strategies, and supported inclusive education. Field experiences are integrated with classroom instruction.
EDCI 346 (Strategies of Science Instruction in Senior High, Junior High and Middle School)
Acquaints students with developmentally appropriate content materials and methods in teaching science in the high school, junior high and middle school (includes life and physical sciences). Includes an overview of the role of the high school, junior high and middle school science teacher today, the high school, junior high and middle school philosophy, use of technology and planning of instructional units. Field experiences are integrated with classroom instruction.
EDCI 347 (Strategies of Social Studies Instruction in Senior High, Junior High and Middle School)
Acquaints students with developmentally appropriate content materials, methods and literature relating to the social studies field generally and the intense teaching areas particularly. Includes an overview of the role of the high school, junior high and middle school social studies teachers today, the high school, junior high and middle school philosophy, use of technology, and planning of instructional units. Field experiences are integrated with classroom instruction.

EDCI 355 (Teaching and Learning K-12 Classroom)
Acquaints students with general methods of promoting the learning process in the K-12 school. Topics studied will include long-term and short-term instructional planning and evaluation; classroom organization including management, motivation of students,, the use of media to promote instructional objectives; and individual and group learning procedure. Students will also study how curriculum goals are adapted and implemented in the classroom.

EDCI 497 (Supervised Teaching In The Elementary School)
Sixteen weeks of full-time student teaching in elementary school classrooms under the supervision of the elementary education staff and public school teachers. Emphasis on preparation and presentation of major teaching units and full classroom responsibility. You will have a separate placement for the special education portion. Students completing the dual licensure program will student teach for 8 weeks in the general education setting and 8 weeks in the special education setting.

Student teaching is a full semester experience that involves several school sites across the region, as well as long-distance and out-of-state sites. Because of the number of teaching candidates, not all student teaching assignments can be made within PDS schools. However, some PDS schools do opt to have small cohorts of student teachers in their buildings, where they are supervised by an on-site educator (e.g., administrator or lead teacher). The cohort model provides student teachers with immediate access to a supervisor and the support of peers within the building