Counseling

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CACREP Accreditation and Program Information (Please click on link for report)

See what our students have to say about our programs!

Video: Mental Health Counseling testimonial from Jil Hus

Video: Mental Health Counseling testimonial from Jennifer Pedroza

Accreditation

CACREP logoThe Clinical Mental Health Counseling and School Counseling programs have earned the full-8 year accreditation from the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Both programs are accredited through October 31, 2020.

Introduction

The Counseling and Development program within the School of Education
at Purdue University Calumet offers course work leading to the
Master’s of Science in Education degree. Within the broad counseling major, programs
may be shaped so as to fit the setting in which prospective counselors
plan to work: educational settings – elementary, secondary, higher
education; or non-educational settings – social agencies, vocational/employment
programs, hospital/mental health facilities, employee assistance
programs, parole/probation work, etc.

For those stakeholders, alumni, and students who wish to view the Counseling & Development Program’s yearly Assessment Updates in the TaskStream Exhibit Room created for this purpose, you may do so at https://www.taskstream.com/ts/manage/CACREPSITEUpdatedJanuary2012.html.  In order to view these updates, you must contact the Exhibit Room Administrator, Prof. Mary J. Didelot at didelot@purduecal.edu indicating the nature of your interest in obtaining a password to this room.  Updates will be completed by January 31 of each year.”

Consistent with the professional views and standards in the
field, and with the goal of providing education and training
that will make graduates competitive in the job market, the M.S.
program concentration in School
Counseling requires a minimum of 50 credit hours of graduate
study, the M.S. in Education program concentration in Mental
Health Counseling requires a minimum of 60 credit hours,
the M.S. program concentration in Human
Services requires a minimum of 33 hours, and the certificate
in Addictions requires a minimum of 18 credit hours. . Core courses,
foundation courses, electives, and various levels of supervised
practical experience comprise these hours.

The program’s faculty is committed to establishing a thoughtful
environment that promotes counselor competence, strong professional
ethics and values, personal integrity and a sense of responsibility
towards meeting the needs of individuals and families from diverse
populations. As a result, any student receiving a grade of “C” in
any two courses will be dropped from the program.

The counselor education faculty maintain that, regardless of
the work setting upon which the prospective counselor plans to
focus, there is a common core of preparation basic to all entrants.
Most of the core is concentrated into the first half of the program
so that specialization, although initiated in the early stages,
will expand in the latter portion of the program.

The M.S. in Education degree is considered a terminal program in the sense that
all graduates will be qualified to assume professional positions
in the field. However it should be understood that further post-MS
study (not necessarily doctoral) and/or training may be desirable
or expected in some work settings.

In addition to educational administration,
we also offer many other degree program concentrations and license programs such as school,
mental health, human services, or addictions counseling
(certificate
and license), special education (degree
and license), and instructional
technology
for school personnel or business/industry
folks (degree or certificate).  

The Purdue name has always stood for quality
and we here at Purdue Calumet are continuing that fine tradition.   If
you wish to open doors to employment or simply wish to advance
your careers, we have a program that will meet those needs with
the added benefit of the Purdue name.

For more information email
the graduate secretary
or contact the program chairs through
the link below.

Advisors for School and Mental Health
Counseling and Human Services Program

Dr. Lisa Hollingsworth, Program Chair,
ANNX-108
219-989-2789
hollings@purduecal.edu
Homepage

Dr. Mary Didelot
ANNX-116
219-989-2059
didelot@purduecal.edu
Homepage

Bonnie Colon, M.S., LMHC
ANNX-106
219-989-2693
bcolon@purduecal.edu

Dr. Mashone Parker-Wright
ANNX-114
219-989-2456
Mashone.Parker@purduecal.edu

Accreditation

Purdue University Calumet’s
School of Education is fully accredited by the National Council
for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).  Our programs
received particular praise from NCATE examiners for the faculty
and staff’s commitment to diversity, including students
with special needs.

The Clinical Mental Health Counseling and School Counseling programs have earned the full-8 year accreditation from the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Both programs are accredited through October 31, 2020.

New and Notable

The Fifth Annual C&D Poster Session (PPT)

Presented by Students in the Counseling and Development Program
April 30, 2014

 

New!!! Assistant Professor

The Counseling and Development Program is pleased to welcome our new Assistant Professor, Dr. Mashone Parker-Wright. Her PhD is in Counselor Education & Supervision, with a minor in Program Evaluation, from The University of Iowa in Iowa City, IA. She also has a Master’s Degree in clinical counseling from Eastern Illinois University, and she is a nationally certified counselor. Mashone has most recently taught undergraduate courses in counseling at the University of Iowa. Her research interests are multicultural counseling, social class factors and vicarious trauma of counselors. Mashone’s philosophy of teaching, research and service focuses on multiculturalism and counseling in a diverse society.

 

The School Counseling Program Now Admits Students Twice a Year

Applications and materials for the School Counseling Program are accepted the 1st Monday in October during Fall Semester the 2nd Monday in February during the Spring Semester. Submit all application materials to Gyte Annex 142.

Please note, the deadline for spring admission has been extended to November 4th for all programs.

New Laboratory, Supervision, and Seminar Facilities

The Counseling and Development Program has its own building for our laboratory
courses (Counseling Theories and Techniques Lab and Human Relations in Group
Counseling Lab), supervision (Practicum and Internship seminars and supervision
of graduate assistants), and seminar courses.  The CSRV building is
located on 169th Street.  It contains four laboratory rooms with audio/video
taping capabilities, an observation room, a seminar room with multimedia
access, and faculty workspace.  The laboratory facilities allow students
to be videotaped for training purposes while practicing their skills in individual
and group counseling.  Constructive feedback concerning their counseling
skills can then be provided by professors, graduate assistants, and peers.



Important Links:

School Counseling
Program

The School Counseling Program emphasizes the connection between
the school and community and is guided by the American
School Counseling Association’s
(ASCA) National Model
for School Counseling Programs. 

The National Standards can be found
by clicking
here
. The Indiana Department of Education information for
school counselors can be found at http://www.doe.state.in.us/sservices/sc.htm.

School Counseling Cohort and Gates
Sequence
of Courses

Field Experience and Internship
Licensure
Portfolio


School Counseling Cohort and Course Sequence

The 2002 state of Indiana licensing framework (Rule 2002) has
led PUC to a new alignment of coursework.  The state and national
accreditation agencies now expect that all courses at PUC align
with the national standards for school leaders. In order to meet
this expectation, Counseling and Development has created a program
that is sequenced and aligned with the standards (See
the the School Counseling Standards.
These standards are based
on the Indiana Professional State Standards Board’s standards
for School Service Professionals and School Counseling Professionals)
.
Each fall, a new cohort of candidates is admitted into the program.  That
cohort will stay together throughout the entire length of the program.   Please
see the Plan of Study/Course Sequence for more information.

Dispositions: School Counselors will be evaluated each year on
dispositions. See the
Dispositional Evaluation Form
.
  The dispositions
are an important part of the Gates.

Explanation of Gates

In addition to the course sequence, PUC has also initiated 4 gates.  These
gates are intended to measure whether a candidate is prepared to
proceed in the program. Click
here to download the Gates for Assessment form
.
 

  • Gate 1, admission, is the process of getting admitted into
    the program. Please note that there is a counseling supplement
    that must be completed for the application process. This supplement
    is available under “Forms” above.
  • Gate 2 follows the first 2 courses, or first
    year of the program, and is designed to gauge how candidates
    are performing on the various competencies and course requirements.
    If all competencies have been satisfied and the candidate has
    maintained a GPA of 3.0 or higher, then they can proceed in
    the program. If the candidate has failed to meet competencies
    or has a GPA lower than 3.0, they will exit the program at
    this gate. Dispositions are also assessed for progression through
    this gate.
  • Gate 3 comprises the second and third years
    of the student’s program. As with Gate 2, the student must
    maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher and meet all required competencies.
    Dispositions are also assessed for progression through this
    gate.
  • Official electronic graduation “paperwork,” the Plan of Study, is prepared by the candidate and approved by the academic advisor, the Head of Graduate Studies in Education, and the Graduate School.  This summative documentation of coursework is submitted when the candidate registers for the last course.  The Plan of Study must be received by the Graduate School during the semester before the semester of graduation. Please follow the instructions to access the online Plan of Study by clicking on this link.
  • Gate 4 is the post-graduate gate for the program.
    It is important to us that we keep in contact with you, so
    please keep us updated on your employment and how we may contact
    you (i.e., your current email address and home address).

 

Sequence of Courses for School Counseling/Sequence
of Courses

M.S. in Ed. – SCHOOL COUNSELING
Letter codes: F=Fall ; S= Spring ; SS=Summer

***Semesters courses offered are subject to change

First Year: 18 cr hrs

Sem

Date Planned

Date Completed

Cr Hrs

EDPS 50100 – Intro to School Cslg

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 59100 – Counseling
Children and Adolescents

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 60000 – Cslg Theory/Techniques

S

_________

_________

3

EDPS 60900 – Program Dev/Ethics/Consultation

S

_________

_________

3

EDPS 50500 – Career Theory

SS

_________

_________

3

EDPS 507 – Cslg Multi & Div Pop

SS

_________

_________

3

 

Second Year: 18 cr hrs

       

EDPS 59100 – Human Growth & Life Span Development

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 60100- Cslg Tech Lab

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 50000 – Human Relations Group Cslg

S

_________

_________

3

EDPS 61000 – Cslg Practicum

S

_________

_________

3

EDPS 53100- Intro Measurement & Eval

SS

_________

_________

3

EDPS 62000 – Sem: Addictions

SS

_________

_________

3

 

Third Year:
15 cr hrs

       

EDPS 59100 – Research in Counseling

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 69500 – Internship – 300 clock hrs

*Students must have permission of the faculty to register
for internship. 

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 62000 *Sem:  Choose
elective from choices below

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 69500 – Internship – 300 clock hrs

S

_________

_________

3

EDPS 62000 – *Sem:
Choose elective from choices below

S

_________

_________

3

     

Total Hours

51

* Choice of Electives for Spring Semesters

       

1. Abuse or Couples/Families (3 cr hrs)

       

2. Counseling and Psychopathology (3 cr hrs)

       

3. Issues in Counseling

       
4. Health Psychology        
5. Integrating
Students with Special Needs
       
6. Three-Part Seminar (total of 3 cr. hrs):
Brief Counseling (1 cr. hr)
Sexual Orientation (1 cr. hr)
Counseling Clients with Eating Disorders (1 cr. hr)
       

 

Field Experiences
for School Counselors

There are 3 types of field experiences required of students:

  1. Course requirements:  The Counseling and Development program
    strongly believes in having students out in the field gaining “real
    life” experience under the guidance and supervision of
    trained counselors.  As such, many of our courses will have
    a field experience component.  The requirements will vary
    for each course, but will not require as many hours in the field
    as practicum and internship.  For example, a student may
    be required to go into a school setting and present a program
    to classes.
  2. Practicum:  This is a one-semester, 100-hour, field experience
    that students take after the majority of their coursework is
    complete.  Of the 100 hours, 40 must be direct, face-to-face
    work with students/clients in individual and group settings.  It
    also includes a one-hour weekly supervision session on site.  The
    practicum is the precursor to the internship and will also include
    a weekly seminar/supervision with a PUC instructor.
  3. Internship:  The purpose of the master’s level internship
    is to provide students with entry-level professional experience
    while under supervision.  This experience allows the student
    to sample the work routine and expectations of the counselor
    in a school or mental health setting.  The internship has
    a 600-clock-hour requirement, and 240 clock hours must be in
    direct service to students/clients.  Direct service is defined
    as an interaction with students/clients that includes the application
    of counseling, consultation, and/or human development skills.  Supervision
    is an integral part of the internship experience.  Interns
    meet with a site-supervisor weekly, and the site supervisor must
    be available for consultation with the student when needed.  Interns
    also meet weekly with a faculty member for seminar/supervision.

POSSIBLE PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP ACTIVITIES FOR
SCHOOL COUNSELORS

Personal Counseling
Confidentiality/Legal and Ethical Guidelines           
Grief/Loss
Counseling Theories/Techniques               
Depression/Anxiety/Suicide
Eating Disorders                                             
Drug/Alcohol Abuse
Behavior Management                                       
Divorce/Stepfamily
Gender Issues                                               
Interpersonal Relationships
Crises Intervention                                        
Harassment (Physical or Sexual)
Conflict Resolution                                                       
Reporting Procedures for Physical/Sexual Abuse and Neglect
Group Counseling
Confidentiality Guidelines                               
Self Esteem
Group Counseling Techniques/Procedures           
At-Risk
Children of Alcoholics                                            
Eating Disorders
Grief/Loss                                                       
Diversity Issues
Divorce/Stepfamily                                         
Study Skills                           
Recovery (Drug/Alcohol Abuse)                        
Interpretation of Standardized Testing Scores: SAT/PSAT/ACT, ASVAB,
ISTEP/CTBS, Others

Additional Counselor Activities

Class Presentations                                      
College Scholarship Letters of Application
Family Counseling                                          
Preparation and Distribution of Parent, Student and Parent Orientation                  
Presentations
in the school and community
Facilitate Student/Teacher Relationships            
Referrals to outside agencies
Understand and Participate in Disciplinary Hearings
Collaborate with teachers, administrators, program
Assessment and Evaluation
Parents and community agencies to facilitate Parent/Teacher/Student
Conferences
Student success
Special Education Case Conferences Department/Team Meetings    Referrals
for Special Education Services
Internship Time Line for Meeting with Site Supervisors

Before beginning the internship, the site supervisor:

  1. Interviews the prospective intern

  2. Provides the intern with any relevant site information/application
    materials if applicable.

  3. Reads and signs the Internship Agreement Form

During the internship, the site supervisor:

  1. Meets with the intern, on average, weekly for one hour of individual
    supervision.

  2. Reviews and signs the intern’s
    weekly log to verify hours and activities.

  3. Evaluates the intern around the mid-point (300 hours) of internship
    using the evaluation form provided

  4. Meets with the intern’s faculty
    supervisor and intern for a conference (the intern is responsible
    for arranging this meeting)

At the conclusion of the internship, the site
supervisor:

  1. Evaluates the intern after 600 hours
    have been completed;  the
    intern will provide the evaluation form

  2. Considers providing the intern with a letter of recommendation.

Professional Competence

The
program’s faculty is committed to establishing a thoughtful environment
that promotes counselor competence, strong professional ethics
and values, personal integrity and a sense of responsibility towards
meeting the needs of individuals and families from diverse populations.
As a result, any student receiving a grade of “C” in
any two courses will be dropped from the program.

 

Licensure

The School Counseling Program is based on Indiana State Professional
Standards for School Service Professionals, the Standards for School
Counseling Professionals, the American School Counselor Association
model of National Standards for School Counseling Programs [ASCA],
and the Education Trust National Initiative for Transforming School
Counseling [Education Trust]. As such, candidates graduating from
Purdue University Calumet’s school counseling program will be eligible
for state certification as school counselors.

The state of Indiana grants licensure or certification to candidates
who have met requirements as set by the state. Those students graduating
from Purdue University Calumet’s School Counseling Program will
be eligible for this license. The state does not require a teaching
license to become licensed as a school counselor.

For those students interested in becoming licensed in the schools
and who already possess a master’s degree in a related helping
field, such as mental health counseling or social work, the state
still requires instructional and field based experiences in school
counseling in order to qualify for licensure. Application and acceptance
to Purdue Calumet’s counseling program can ensure that these requirements
would be met. Assessment of a student’s education will be conducted
on a case by case basis to evaluate which courses completed at
the master’s level would fulfill state requirements and standards.

For licensing information for our program
contact Virginia Rhodes at edlicensing@purduecal.edu

The state requirements for licensure or certification can be found
by going to: http://www.doe.state.in.us/sservices.counslic.htm

 

TaskStream:
Your Electronic Portfolio

To aid in
the assessment of our program and provide you with a venue for demonstrating
your attainment of the standards and showcasing your work, the Graduate
Studies in Education Department has adopted an electronic portfolio system
that is being implemented in TaskStream. You will need to purchase your TaskStream account the first semester of the program, and you will be charged $69.00 for each 2-year period required for this electronic portfolio.

Obtaining a TaskStream Account

You will be required to purchase a two-year subscription to TaskStream in the amount of $69.00. After two years you will need to renew your account by purchasing another two-year subscription.

Activating Your TaskStream Account

The first thing you will need to do is create a TaskStream subscription. Go to the TaskStream web site and click the “Create or Renew Account” link.

  • Step 1: Activate Subscription
    • Select Create
    • Continue Option 1
  • Step 2: General Information
    • Select College/University and Continue
    • Select Indiana
    • Select College/University
    • Select Purdue University System: Purdue University Calumet
    • Continue
  • Step 3: Personal Information
    • Select:
      • School of Education
      • Select Graduate Studies in Education
      • Select Program (Administration, Counseling, Instructional Technology, or Special Education)
      • Select Student
    • Subscription information:
      • Select 2 year account for $69
    • General Information
      • Input your information and select Student Role
    • Select Tool Pakcs (optional – NOT required)
      • Selet Yes or No
    • End-User Agreement
      • Select Accept and Continue
  • Step 4: Confirmation Registration Information
    • Review and Continue
  • Step 5: Confirm Subscription Period
    • Proceed to Checkout
  • Step 6: Billing Information
    • Input information as needed and click Continue
  • After Purchasing: Email Virginia Rhodes(rhodesv@purduecal.edu) to assign you to the correct Gate
    • Please specify your name, and the name of your program (Administration, Counseling, Instructional Technology, or Special Education)

Need
additional help? Dial 1-800-311-5656 to contact TaskStream’s Helpdesk.

Once you have paid for your electronic portfolio, you will
receive a password to log on to TaskStream.

You must submit work from
selected Counseling & Development courses to TaskStream each semester
for review. The artifacts (assignments) you submit from each course are
assessed according to the course-specific rubric in TaskStream. The rubric
will address the specific graduate standards aligned with each course’s
content and expectations. You must demonstrate competency on each criteria,
and may not be allowed to proceed in the program if you receive too many
developing or unacceptable ratings.

The TaskStream assignment is a major
course and program requirement. Failure to complete the entry can mean
failure to meet the gate requirements. Therefore, if the entry is not
completed by the end of each course, you will receive an F for that course.

In addition to the course-specific portfolio,
your TaskStream account will also allow you to create a separate presentation
portfolio that you can share with potential employers or others to whom
you wish to display your work. What a great way to highlight your skills
to future employers. Training opportunities for creating such a portfolio
will be offered on campus and are frequently offered online through TaskStream.
There are also online tutorials to assist you in downloading your artifacts
into TaskStream. It is a very simple process; very much like attaching
a document to an email. You are encouraged to save electronic or hard
copies of all notable assignments or other work you complete for possible
inclusion in a presentation portfolio.

IMPORTANT NOTE: TaskStream submissions
are due when the instructor tells you, but they must be completed prior
to final exam week. If assignments are not in before finals week, you
will receive an F for the course.

The TaskStream website is https://www.taskstream.com/pub/ Once
you are on TaskStream, you can obtain help through telephone or email
at 1.800.311.5656 or help@taskstream.com.


Mental Health Counseling Program

Sequence of
Courses

Field Experience and Internship
Licensure
Portfolio – New Students
Portfolio – Students NOT in TaskStream

The Mental Health Counseling Program is based on the American
Counseling Association’s Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice and Indiana
Health Professions Bureau requirements for mental health counselors. As
such, candidates graduating from Purdue University Calumet’s mental health
counseling program will be eligible for state licensure as a mental health
counselor once they have fulfilled all state requirements. As clinicians,
they will have the capability to do the following:

1. Leadership and Advocacy

  • Provide competent professional service and leadership within the mental
    health field upon graduation
  • Demonstrate a broad range of professional competencies relevant to the
    professional practice of mental health counseling (e.g., advocacy, counseling,
    consulting, professional development, leading, managing, and supervising)
  • Act as advocates for those individuals and families to whom they provide
    services

2. Diversity

  • Demonstrate knowledge of and respect for the influence of culture, ethnicity,
    gender, race, sexual orientation, religion, ability, and socioeconomic
    class in counseling individuals from diverse populations
  • Maintain a multicultural and global perspective, emphasizing social
    justice for all
  • Demonstrate competency in implementing culturally appropriate counseling
    techniques of assessment, intervention, and intervention evaluation with
    diverse clients
  • Demonstrate the ability to practice in a manner consistent with a fundamental
    belief that all individuals have the capacity to grow, change and learn

3. Collaboration

  • Interact with a full spectrum of mental health professionals
  • Collaborate skillfully and respectfully as leaders, consultants, and
    team leaders in a variety of settings
  • Exhibit sensitive and mature personal relationships in professional
    interactions

4. Programming

  • Develop programming that integrates theories of human behavior and human
    development
  • Have a general knowledge of and experience with treatment modalities
    appropriate for a broad range of mental health service recipients and
    mental health service settings

5. Research

  • Demonstrate competency in evaluating research and applying it to counseling
  • Bridge theory and research into practice

6. Ethics/Professional Identity

  • Model and engage in behaviors consistent with the legal and ethical
    standards of the counseling profession
  • Establish a professional identity as mental health counselors
  • Think critically and engage in reflective, ethical, and legal practice
    throughout their education and their professional lives
  • Pursue lifelong professional and personal development through continuing
    education, counseling, and participation and leadership in professional
    organizations
  • Demonstrate competency in personal and career counseling with individuals
    and groups

7. Professional Competence

The program’s faculty is committed to establishing a thoughtful environment
that promotes counselor competence, strong professional ethics and values,
personal integrity and a sense of responsibility towards meeting the needs
of individuals and families from diverse populations. As a result, any student
receiving a grade of “C” in any two courses will be dropped
from the program.


Sequence
of Courses in Mental Health Counseling

M.S. in Ed. – MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING
Letter codes: F=Fall ; S= Spring ; SS=Summer
***Semesters courses offered are subject to change

First Year: 15 cr hrs

Sem

Date Planned

Date Completed

Cr Hrs

EDPS 50300 – Intro to Mental Health Cslg

SS

_________

_________

3

EDPS 60000 – Cslg Theory/Techniques

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 62000 – Psychopathology

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 59100 – Ethics and Professional Identity

S

_________

_________

3

EDPS 62000 – Sem: Abuse or Couples/Families

S

_________

_________

3

 

Second Year: 18 cr hrs

       

EDPS 50500 – Career Theory

SS

_________

_________

3

EDPS 50700 – Cslg Multi & Div Pop

SS

_________

_________

3

EDPS 50000 – Human Relations Group Cslg

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 59100 – Human Growth &
Life Span Development

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 60100 – Cslg Tech Lab

S

_________

_________

3

EDPS 62000 – Sem: Choose elective from choices below

S

_________

_________

3

 

Third Year: 18 cr hrs

       

EDPS 53100 – Intro Measurement
& Eval.

SS

_________

_________

3

EDPS 62000 – Sem: Addictions

SS

_________

_________

3

EDPS 59100 – Research in Counseling

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 61000 – Cslg Practicum

F

_________

_________

3

EDPS 62000 – *Sem: Choose elective from choices
below

S

_________

_________

3

EDPS 69500 – Internship – 300 clock hours

3
 
     

 

 

3

Fourth Year: 9 cr. hrs

 

 

 

 

EDPS 62000 – *Sem: Choose elective from choices below

SS
 
     
    3
 
     
 
   
 
 
 

EDPS 69500 – Internship – 300 clock hours

SS
 
     
    3

EDPS 69500 – Internship – 300 clock hours

F
 
     
    3
     

Total Hours

60

* Choice of Electives

       

1. Health Psychology (3 cr hrs)

       

2. Three-part Seminar (total of 3 cr hrs)
Brief Counseling (1 cr hr)
Counseling Clients with Eating Disorders (1 cr hr)
Counseling GLBT Clients (1 cr hr)

       

3. Play Therapy (3 cr hrs)

       
4. Abuse or Couples/Families (3 cr hrs)        
5. Integrating Students with
Special Needs (3 cr hrs)
       

 

Field
Experiences for Mental Health Counselors

There are 3 types of field experiences required of
students:

  1. Class requirements:  The Counseling and Development program strongly
    believes in having students out in the field gaining “real life” experience
    under the guidance and supervision of trained counselors.  As such,
    many of our courses will have a field experience component.  The
    requirements will vary for each course, but will not require as many hours
    in the field as practicum and internship. 
  2. Practicum:  This is a one-semester, 100-hour, field experience
    that students take after the majority of their coursework is complete.  Of
    the 100 hours, 40 must be direct, face-to-face work with students/clients
    in individual and group settings.  It also includes a one-hour weekly
    supervision session on site.  The practicum is the precursor to the
    internship and will also include a weekly seminar/supervision with a PUC
    instructor.
  3. Internship:  The purpose of the master’s level internship
    is to provide students with entry-level professional experience while
    under supervision.  This experience allows the student to sample
    the work routine and expectations of the counselor in a school or mental
    health setting.  The internship has a 900-clock-hour requirement,
    and 360 clock hours must be in direct service to students/clients.  Direct
    service is defined as an interaction with students/clients that includes
    the application of counseling, consultation, and/or human development
    skills.  Supervision is an integral part of the internship experience.  Interns
    meet with a site-supervisor weekly, and the site supervisor must be available
    for consultation with the student when needed.  Interns also meet
    weekly with a faculty member for seminar/supervision.  You must
    have completed the practicum course before taking internship. In addition,
    you must obtain permission from the Counseling and Development faculty
    before registering for internship
    .

Internship Time Line for Meeting
with Site Supervisors

Before beginning the internship, the site supervisor:

  1. Interviews the prospective intern
  2. Provides the intern with any relevant site information/application materials
    if applicable.
  3. Reads and signs the Internship Agreement Form

During the internship, the site supervisor:

  1. Meets with the intern, on average, weekly for one hour of individual
    supervision.
  2. Reviews and signs the intern’s weekly log to verify hours and
    activities.
  3. Evaluates the intern around the mid-point of internship using the evaluation
    form provided
  4. Meets with the intern’s faculty supervisor and intern for a conference
    (the intern is responsible for arranging this meeting)

At the conclusion of the internship, the site supervisor:

  1. Evaluates the intern after 900 hours have been completed;  the
    intern will provide the evaluation form
  2. Considers providing the intern with a letter of recommendation.

 

Licensure

The state of Indiana now grants licensure to mental
health counselors, an important professional advancement for those obtaining
their master’s degree. The program at Purdue Calumet is designed to put
students in the position to apply for licensure once they have completed
all requirements outlined by the state. In brief, a candidate for licensure
in Indiana must fulfill the following requirements:

1. Receive a master’s degree in an area related to
mental health counseling from an accredited institution of higher education.
Purdue Calumet is such an institution.

2. Complete the following educational requirements
(all are met through Purdue’s program in mental health counseling):

  • complete 60 semester hours of graduate coursework in counseling. There
    are 12 areas of focus for the coursework, such as human growth and development,
    lifestyle and career development, and clinical instruction, to name a
    few.
  • not less than one supervised clinical practicum, internship, or field
    experience in a counseling setting. This must total a minimum of 1,000
    clock hours consisting of one practicum of 100 hours, one internship of
    600 hours, and one advanced internship of 300 hours with at least 100
    hours of face to face supervision.

3. Obtain 3,000 post-master’s hours of clinical experience
over a two-year period. 3000 hrs equals approximately 1 1/2 years of full
time work in a counseling setting. Included in this is 100 hours of supervision
by a licensed mental health counselor or equivalent.

4. Satisfactorily complete an exam provided by the
board. All mental health counselors must obtain licensure if they are to
use the title of “mental health counselor.” This is required by
law. It will not be mandatory that everyone seeking employment in community
mental health settings have the licensure and use the mental health counselor
title. What jobs will require it is not well defined at this point, but
it is safe to say that it will be necessary for most counseling/therapy
oriented positions in clinical and/or hospital settings, and for private
counseling. Youth agencies, shelters, and career counseling offices are
examples of settings that may not require licensure. Required or not, It
is probably advisable for most graduates of the mental health counseling
program to strongly consider obtaining licensure.

The advantages of licensure are many. Foremost, it
puts mental health counselors in competitive positions with other mental
health providers, such as psychologists, social workers, and marriage and
family therapists. It offers the opportunity to have greater autonomy, such
as private practice. Licensure also maintains the profession at a higher
standard which gives it more respect and acceptance in professional and
public communities. Finally, licensure could afford mental health professionals
the opportunity to use insurance companies for reimbursement of payment
(this advantage is still not clearly spelled out by the law).

For more information and application materials, contact:

Licensing/Credentialing BodySocial Worker, MFT’s, & MentalHealth
Counselor BoardHealth Professions Bureau, 402 W. Washington St., Rm. 041,
Indianapolis, IN 4620-4317/232-2960317/233-4236 (FAX) http://www.in.gov/pla/social.htm

 


The
Portfolio for Mental Health Counselors
- New Students

For those of you who are now on Taskstream (including all new students admitted into the program), here is the information about our electronic portfolio system:

TaskStream: Your Electronic Portfolio

To aid in the assessment of our program and provide you with a venue for demonstrating your attainment of the standards and showcasing your work, the Graduate Studies in Education Department has adopted an electronic portfolio system that is being implemented in Task Stream. There is a charge of $69.00 for use of this system for two years.

Obtaining a TaskStream Account

You will be required to purchase a two-year subscription to TaskStream in the amount of $69.00. After two years you will need to renew your account by purchasing another two-year subscription.

Activating Your TaskStream Account

The first thing you will need to do is create a TaskStream subscription. Go to the TaskStream web site and click the “Create or Renew Account” link.

  • Step 1: Activate Subscription
    • Select Create
    • Continue Option 1
  • Step 2: General Information
    • Select College/University and Continue
    • Select Indiana
    • Select College/University
    • Select Purdue University System: Purdue University Calumet
    • Continue
  • Step 3: Personal Information
    • Select:
      • School of Education
      • Select Graduate Studies in Education
      • Select Program (Administration, Counseling, Instructional Technology, or Special Education)
      • Select Student
    • Subscription information:
      • Select 2 year account for $69
    • General Information
      • Input your information and select Student Role
    • Select Tool Pakcs (optional – NOT required)
      • Selet Yes or No
    • End-User Agreement
      • Select Accept and Continue
  • Step 4: Confirmation Registration Information
    • Review and Continue
  • Step 5: Confirm Subscription Period
    • Proceed to Checkout
  • Step 6: Billing Information
    • Input information as needed and click Continue
  • After Purchasing: Email Virginia Rhodes(rhodesv@purduecal.edu) to assign you to the correct Gate
    • Please specify your name, and the name of your program (Administration, Counseling, Instructional Technology, or Special Education)

Need
additional help? Dial 1-800-311-5656 to contact TaskStream’s Helpdesk.

You must submit work from selected Counseling & Development courses to TaskStream each semester for review. The artifacts (assignments) you submit from each course are assessed according to the course-specific rubric in TaskStream. The rubric will address the specific graduate standards aligned with each course’s content and expectations. You must demonstrate competency on each criteria, and may not be allowed to proceed in the program if you receive too many developing or unacceptable ratings.

The artifacts required for the School Counseling Program can be found on our website.

The TaskStream assignment is a major course and program requirement. Failure to complete the entry can mean failure to meet the gate requirements. Therefore, if the entry is not completed by the end of each course, you will receive an F for that course.

In addition to the course-specific portfolio, your TaskStream account will also allow you to create a separate presentation portfolio that you can share with potential employers or others to whom you wish to display your work. What a great way to highlight your skills to future employers. Training opportunities for creating such a portfolio will be offered on campus and are frequently offered online through TaskStream. There are also online tutorials to assist you in downloading your artifacts into TaskStream. It is a very simple process; very much like attaching a document to an email. You are encouraged to save electronic or hard copies of all notable assignments or other work you complete for possible inclusion in a presentation portfolio.

IMPORTANT NOTE: TaskStream submissions are due when the instructor tells you, but they must be completed prior to final exam week. If assignments are not in before finals week, you will receive an “F” for the course.


The
Portfolio for Mental Health Counselors
- Students NOT in TaskStream Portfolios

The portfolio serves as the comprehensive examination
for the Master’s in Mental Health Counseling. The portfolio will focus
on professional development throughout the program and will provide evidence
of a student’s competence in the areas described in Appendix E.  The
portfolio  must be completed and given to your advisor the semester
before graduation.
 

Portfolio Reviews

Initial Review: Will take place during the spring
semester of the second year and after the completion of the required coursework
during that year. (Download
the Initial Review Form
)

Final Review: Will take place during the semester
before graduation. (Download the Final
Review Form
)

**It is the candidate’s responsibility
to initiate these reviews with your advisor.  It is also the candidate’s
responsibility to make an appointment early in the semester before graduation
to do the Plan of Study.  Candidates cannot graduate until the portfolio
has been passed and the Plan of Study has been completed and signed. 

In addition to portfolio review, you will be evaluated
yearly on your progression through the program. Successful completion and
demonstration of mastery in the portfolio is just one part of advancement
through the program.

Final Entry. The final entry in your portfolio is
to be a paper entitled “Final Reflections on Myself, My Portfolio,
and the Counseling Program.
” This paper should include reflections
regarding your personal and professional growth during the program, discussion
of what the portfolio shows about you and how it gives evidence of the growth
you noted, and what aspects of the counseling program were particularly
significant in your growth and development as a counselor. This paper should
be submitted to your advisor at least one week prior to your meeting for
the final review. Your Advisor will discuss this paper with you at the final
review, and then it will be returned to you to become part of your finished
professional portfolio.

Please refer to this website for a description of
the portfolio process and scoring rubric.  Mental Health Counseling
candidates will complete entries and reflections based on those found below.  You
do not need to include entries required for School Counseling candidates.  

Portfolio
Standards for Mental Health Counseling

School of Education’s General
Standards

1. Instructional Uses of Technology: The graduate
understands the central concepts related to educational technology, and
can effectively and appropriately implement this technology into classroom
preparation and instruction.

2. Individuals with Special Needs: The graduate understands
various learning and physical disabilities, how these may be manifested
in learning situations, and how to adapt instruction to ensure success for
all individuals.

3. Diversity: The graduate understands the nature
of diversity in the human community, how cultural and gender differences
can affect learning, and how to create a learning environment that protects
the individuality and dignity of all learners.

4. Written Communication: The graduate uses knowledge
of appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and written communication in preparing
instructional materials and can effectively communicate with all stakeholders
within the professional community.

5. Educational Research: The graduate understands
current trends in educational research and can critically examine this research
in relationship to his/her profession.

6. Community Collaboration: The graduate understands
the dynamics of educational, geographic, and school communities; can effectively
participate within these communities; and fosters a learning environment.

7. Content Knowledge: The graduate
understands that professional decisions must be made based on a thorough
knowledge foundation that includes theories, skills, organizational structures  and
cultures, societal  needs, legal foundations, learning theory, research
techniques, and many others. This solid knowledge base will result in
a decision-making process that is reasoned, accurate, and competent.

Mental Health Counseling Portfolio
Entries

The following are the Counseling and Development
Program’s entries.  Entries for the portfolio must include these,
as well as the six (6) School of Education General Standards listed above.

1.  Introspection and Interpersonal Growth:
The graduate demonstrates evidence of introspection and interpersonal growth
through his/her reflections, and can apply this understanding to professional
practices.

2.  Theoretical Concept:  The graduate
demonstrates the ability to theoretically conceptualize as evidenced through
individual counseling.

3.  Group Leadership:  The graduate understands
the qualities of effective group leadership, and can apply this understanding
to professional practices.

4.  Professional and Ethical Behavior:  The
graduate understands and uses appropriate, professional, and ethical behaviors
in all aspects of practice.”

Portfolio
Organization and Review

Portfolios are most effective and useful when they
are organized. Portfolios can be housed in a divided notebook, accordion
file folder system, or computer disk. Regardless of the filing system, it
is required that a Table of Contents be used. Candidates must also include
an informational data sheet (e.g., name, address, phone numbers) or a resume
at the beginning of the portfolio.  The value of portfolios is that
they can reflect individuality; to be most useful, however, clear organization
must be considered.

The portfolios will contain two primary components:
Portfolio Entries and Reflection Statements.

Portfolio Entries

The bulk of the professional portfolio will be the
individual entries. ALL graduate students are required to demonstrate proficiency
in the following General Standards by including at least one separate
entry for EACH standard:

  • Instructional Uses of Technology
  • Individuals with Special Needs
  • Multi-Cultural and Gender Issues
  • Written Communication
  • Educational Research
  • Community Collaboration

In addition, candidates are required to demonstrate
proficiency in the standards developed for their Program Area – School
Counseling. Therefore, all school counseling graduate candidates will have
separate entries for each of the six (6) General Standards, in addition
to
separate entries for each of the ten (10) School Counseling Program
Standards.

Because of the importance of individuality in portfolio
preparation and reflection, specific types of entries for each standard
are not mandated. However, each course in the school counseling program
has components that lead the candidate to good choices of artifacts.

Candidates have the option of including either selections
containing instructors’ comments and evaluations or edited entries without
this feedback.

Portfolio entries cannot overlap; for example, a
selection cannot be counted within multiple entry standards.

Reflection Statements

EACH portfolio entry must be preceded by a Reflection
Statement
, which will include the entry’s title, related entry
standard, and the rationale for its selection into the portfolio. The
statements should include (but are not limited to) the following information:
(1) what course or experience the entry is drawn from, (2) why that particular
piece was selected for that particular standard, (3) how the entry relates
across other standards, and (4) the entry’s potential impact on
the graduate candidate’s professional career. It is also important
to use the reflection statements as a springboard into the internship
experience.  The Reflection Statements must be typed.

Portfolio Review

All graduate students will assume full responsibility
for maintaining their portfolios.
In addition, it is the candidate’s
responsibility to make arrangements to meet with his/her advisor to review
the portfolio’s progress.  Portfolios are reviewed by the advisor
in an informal, ongoing manner through the candidate’s program.
Before completion of the program, portfolios are also reviewed by the
candidate’s committee and a formal defense of the portfolio is made.
Graduate candidates will be recommended for graduation only after they
have successfully defended their portfolio. 

Writing the
Portfolio

Note: Before beginning this section, please refer
to the complete list of all of the School Counseling Standards including
their Knowledges, Skills, and Dispositions.  The portfolio must align
with these standards.  Take a long look at the standards and consider
how you might perform activities that start you along the road to beginning
attainment of the standards. Each course at PUC will align with one or
more of the standards and will guide you through the completion of your
entries. Also remember that the candidate must complete entries for the
General Standards.

Before beginning to write the portfolio entries,
the candidate must think about what activities from their everyday school
life would be good entries for their portfolio. The PUC program will provide
a series of field experience modules that offer chances for the candidate
to use those activities as entries. For example, the first entry must align
with Standard 1 (Students and the Learning Process). One of the activities
suggested would be to ____________. The following exercise will help candidates
seeking licensure in school counseling to build their professional portfolio.  Procedures
are described below that will lead to a completed entry for a professional
portfolio (Standard 1).

  • Obtain a file box from a local office supply store.  This can be
    either a metal or plastic   box with room to store file folders.
  • Place 10 dividers in the box and label them Standard 1, Standard 2,
    etc.
  • Place manila folders in each divider. Be sure to include enough to cover
    all the performances, knowledges, and dispositions in the standards.
  • Consider the phases of (include statement for standard 1). Think about
    what activities a school counselor would use to implement this process.  Choose
    one activity that you will develop in your school setting.  Examples
    include: (provide examples) Think about the knowledges and dispositions
    associated with Standard 1 and discuss those in your narrative section. 
  • Write a reflection about the activity. 
  • Write about how the activity demonstrates your attainment of the standard.
  • Place the written material in the folders.

Rubric for Scoring Portfolio Narratives

The Level 5 performance provides clear, compelling,
and consistent evidence of the candidate’s work to demonstrate attainment
of the standard. There is clear and convincing evidence of the candidate’s
professional growth as demonstrated through the description of the entry,
the analysis of its importance, and the candidate’s reflection on
the activity.

All components are tied together and show that the
impact of the activity is relevant and worthwhile, and part of a significant
and meaningful plan for promoting the professional growth of the candidate
and the improvement of the school and/or knowledge and practice of the education
professionals within the school.

The Level 4 performance provides clear and consistent
evidence of the candidate’s work toward the attainment of the standard,
to improve schools, and advance knowledge and practice of education professionals.  There
is clear and convincing evidence of the candidate’s professional growth
as demonstrated through the description of the artifact, the analysis of
the artifact’s import, and the candidate’s reflection on the
impact of the activity as well as future implications. In any or all of
these areas, a Level 4 performance may show imbalance or unevenness, but
viewed as a whole, the piece provides clear evidence of the candidate’s
professional growth and understanding of the standard.

The Level 3 performance provides some evidence of
the candidate’s work to improve schools and advance knowledge and
practice of education professionals through her understanding of the standard.
Evidence is present of the candidate’s professional growth as demonstrated
through the description of the artifact, the analysis of its import, and
the candidate’s reflection on the impact of the activity as well as
its import for the future; however, such evidence may be less convincing,
substantial, or significant.  Analysis and/or reflection may be superficial
and lack depth.

The Level 2 performance provides limited evidence
of the candidate’s work to improve schools and advance knowledge and
practice of education professionals through an understanding of the standard.  Evidence
of professional growth is limited. Evidence cited through description and
analysis may be weak or skeletal and/or reflection my be missing or unrelated
to description and analysis.

The Level 1 performance provides little or no evidence
of the candidate’s work to improve schools and advance knowledge and
practice of education professionals through an understanding of the standard.  There
is little or no evidence of the candidate’s professional growth.  Description,
analysis, and reflection may be unrelated to one another; may be so vague
that they lack meaning; or one or more of these may be missing.

Chi Sigma Iota (CSI) has initiated over 78,000 professionals and professionals-in-training worldwide and currently has over 14,000 active members among 276 campus based chapters in this country and abroad. Established in 2005, the Psi Upsilon Chi chapter of Chi Sigma Iota is open to all counseling students and alumni who have achieved excellence in Purdue University Calumet’s Counseling and Development Program as well as meet CSI’s criteria.

The Psi Upsilon Chi chapter of Chi Sigma Iota not only takes an active role by providing its members with opportunities to take place in activities and events on campus but within the community as well conducting a number of fundraisers and other philanthropic events throughout the year. Our chapter currently has 47 active members and inducts new members during the spring semesters. Information on CSI and our campus chapter will be provided during new student orientation and throughout the fall semester.

We are pleased to welcome all those interested in joining this prestigious international counseling honorary society where you will be recognized by and affiliated with one of the largest counseling organizations in the world with its sole mission to recognize and promote excellence in the profession of counseling.

For more information please contact Jil Hus, past at jilhus@gmail.com, or Bridget Helms, president at mommahelms@hotmail.com.

Follow the link below for information regarding eligibility criteria and membership application: http://www.csi-net.org/

Human Services
Program

If you desire a Master’s degree in counseling, but you do
not need to be licensed in mental health counseling or school counseling,
this is the program for you.  This is a useful degree for
those in higher education, pastoral counseling, wellness counseling,
those working in the health field, and others.  Twelve of
the hours are electives, therefore your program can be tailored
to meet the needs of your current position while gaining knowledge
and skills in counseling. 

The Human Services degree is a 33 hour program that will not lead
to licensure in school counseling or mental health counseling.  However,
additional courses can be taken to complete the degree in Mental
Health Counseling if a decision to do so is made before the internship
has begun.

Sequence of Courses
Field Experience and Internship
Portfolio
Portfolio Standards for Human Services
Organization and Portfolio Review
Writing the Portfolio


Sequence of Courses for
Master’s in Education: 
Human Services

Introduction to Mental Health Counseling
            EDPS 50300            3
credits

Ethics and Professional Identity
            EDPS 59100            3
credits

Group Processes
            EDPS 50000            3
credits

Counseling and Psychopathology
            EDPS 59100            3
credits

Counseling Diverse Populations
            EDPS 50700           3
credits

Research in Counseling
            EDPS 59100            3
credits

Internship in Education (300 hours)
            EDPS 69500            3
credits

Elective - 3
credits

Elective – 3
credits

Elective – 3
credits

Elective – 3
credits

TOTAL:
33 credits

Electives:  (alternated different semesters;
other electives may be added)

  • Seminar:  Family and Couples
  • Seminar:  Addictions
  • Seminar:  Health Psychology
  • Seminar:  Issues in Counseling
  • Seminar:  Aging and Death
  • Seminar:  Eating Disorders/Brief Therapy/Sexual Orientation
  • Seminar:  Play Therapy
  • Seminar:  Abuse
  • EDPS 591A:  Integrating Students with Special Needs

The Human Services degree does not lead to licensure in school
counseling or mental health counseling.  However, additional
courses can be taken to complete the degree in Mental Health Counseling
if a decision to do so is made before the internship has begun. 

 

Field Experience and Internship

There are 3 types of field experiences required of students:

  • Class requirements:  The Counseling and Development program
    strongly believes in having students out in the field gaining “real
    life” experience under the guidance and supervision of
    trained counselors.  As such, many of our courses will have
    a field experience component.  The requirements will vary
    for each course, but will not require as many hours in the field
    as practicum and internship. 
  • Internship:  The purpose of the master’s level internship
    is to provide students with entry-level professional experience
    while under supervision.  This experience allows the student
    to sample the work routine and expectations of the human services
    setting.  The internship has a 300-clock-hour requirement.  Supervision
    is an integral part of the internship experience.  Interns
    meet with a site-supervisor weekly, and the site supervisor must
    be available for consultation with the student when needed.  Interns
    also meet weekly with a faculty member for seminar/supervision.  You
    must have completed the practicum course before taking internship.
    In addition, you must obtain permission from the Counseling and
    Development faculty before registering for internship.

Internship Time Line for Meeting with Site Supervisors

Before beginning the internship, the site supervisor:

  • Interviews the prospective intern
  • Provides the intern with any relevant site information/application
    materials if applicable.
  • Reads and signs the Internship Agreement Form

During the internship, the site supervisor:

  • Meets with the intern, on average, weekly for one hour of individual
    supervision.
  • Reviews and signs the intern’s weekly log to verify hours
    and activities.
  • Evaluates the intern around the mid-point of internship using
    the evaluation form provided
  • Meets with the intern’s faculty supervisor and intern
    for a conference (the intern is responsible for arranging this
    meeting)

At the conclusion of the internship, the site supervisor:

  • Evaluates the intern after 300 hours have been completed;  the
    intern will provide the evaluation form
  • Considers providing the intern with a letter of recommendation

 

Portfolio for Human Services Program

The portfolio serves as the comprehensive examination for the
Human Services Program. The portfolio will focus on professional
development throughout the program and will provide evidence of
a student’s competence in the areas described in Appendix
E.  The portfolio  must be completed and given to
your advisor the semester before graduation.
 

Portfolio Reviews

Initial Review: Will take place during the spring semester of
the second year and after the completion of the required coursework
during that year. (Download
the Initial Review Form
)

Final Review: Will take place during the semester before graduation.
(Download the Final Review Form)

**It is the candidate’s responsibility to initiate these
reviews with your advisor.  It is also the candidate’s
responsibility to make an appointment early in the semester before
graduation to do the Plan of Study.  Candidates cannot graduate
until the portfolio has been passed and the Plan of Study has
been completed and signed. 

In addition to portfolio review, you will be evaluated yearly
on your progression through the program. Successful completion
and demonstration of mastery in the portfolio is just one part
of advancement through the program.

Final Entry. Final Entry. The final entry in your portfolio is
to be a paper entitled “Final Reflections on Myself, My
Portfolio, and the Human Services Program
.” This paper
should include reflections regarding your personal and professional
growth during the program, discussion of what the portfolio shows
about you and how it gives evidence of the growth you noted, and
what aspects of the program were particularly significant in your
growth and development as a Human Services provider. This paper
should be submitted to your advisor at least one week prior to
your meeting for the final review. Your Advisor will discuss this
paper with you at the final review, and then it will be returned
to you to become part of your finished professional portfolio..

Please refer to this website for a description
of the portfolio process and scoring rubric.  Human
Services candidates will complete entries and reflections based
on those found below.  You
do not need to include entries required for School Counseling candidates.  

 

Portfolio Standards for the Human Services Program

School of Education’s General Standards

1. Instructional Uses of Technology: The graduate understands
the central concepts related to educational technology, and can
effectively and appropriately implement this technology into classroom
preparation and instruction.

2. Individuals with Special Needs: The graduate understands various
learning and physical disabilities, how these may be manifested
in learning situations, and how to adapt instruction to ensure
success for all individuals.

3. Diversity: The graduate understands the nature of diversity
in the human community, how cultural and gender differences can
affect learning, and how to create a learning environment that
protects the individuality and dignity of all learners.

4. Written Communication: The graduate uses knowledge of appropriate
verbal, nonverbal, and written communication in preparing instructional
materials and can effectively communicate with all stakeholders
within the professional community.

5. Educational Research: The graduate understands current trends
in educational research and can critically examine this research
in relationship to his/her profession.

6. Community Collaboration: The graduate understands the dynamics
of educational, geographic, and school communities; can effectively
participate within these communities; and fosters a learning environment.

7. Content Knowledge: The graduate understands
that professional decisions must be made based on a thorough knowledge
foundation that includes theories, skills, organizational structures  and
cultures, societal  needs, legal foundations, learning theory,
research techniques, and many others. This solid knowledge base
will result in a decision-making process that is reasoned, accurate,
and competent.

Human Services Portfolio Entries

The following are the Counseling and Development Program’s
entries.  Entries for the portfolio must include these, as
well as the six (6) School of Education General Standards listed
above.

1.  Introspection and Interpersonal Growth: The graduate
demonstrates evidence of introspection and interpersonal growth
through his/her reflections, and can apply this understanding to
professional practices.

2.  Theoretical Concept:  The graduate demonstrates
the ability to theoretically conceptualize as evidenced through
individual counseling.

3.  Group Leadership:  The graduate understands the
qualities of effective group leadership, and can apply this understanding
to professional practices.

4.  Professional and Ethical Behavior:  The graduate
understands and uses appropriate, professional, and ethical behaviors
in all aspects of practice.”

 

Portfolio Organization and Review

Portfolios are most effective and useful when they are organized.
Portfolios can be housed in a divided notebook, accordion file
folder system, or computer disk. Regardless of the filing system,
it is required that a Table of Contents be used. Candidates must
also include an informational data sheet (e.g., name, address,
phone numbers) or a resume at the beginning of the portfolio.  The
value of portfolios is that they can reflect individuality; to
be most useful, however, clear organization must be considered.

The portfolios will contain two primary components: Portfolio
Entries and Reflection Statements.

Portfolio Entries

The bulk of the professional portfolio will be the individual
entries. ALL graduate students are required to demonstrate proficiency
in the following General Standards by including at least one separate
entry for EACH standard:

  • Instructional Uses of Technology
  • Individuals with Special Needs
  • Multi-Cultural and Gender Issues
  • Written Communication
  • Educational Research
  • Community Collaboration

In addition, candidates are required to demonstrate proficiency
in the standards developed for their Program Area – School
Counseling. Therefore, all school counseling graduate candidates
will have separate entries for each of the six (6) General Standards, in
addition to
separate entries for each of the ten (10) School
Counseling Program Standards.

Because of the importance of individuality in portfolio preparation
and reflection, specific types of entries for each standard are
not mandated. However, each course in the school counseling program
has components that lead the candidate to good choices of artifacts.

Candidates have the option of including either selections containing
instructors’ comments and evaluations or edited entries without
this feedback.

Portfolio entries cannot overlap; for example, a selection cannot
be counted within multiple entry standards.

Reflection Statements

EACH portfolio entry must be preceded by a Reflection Statement,
which will include the entry’s title, related entry standard,
and the rationale for its selection into the portfolio. The statements
should include (but are not limited to) the following information:
(1) what course or experience the entry is drawn from, (2) why
that particular piece was selected for that particular standard,
(3) how the entry relates across other standards, and (4) the entry’s
potential impact on the graduate candidate’s professional
career. It is also important to use the reflection statements as
a springboard into the internship experience.  The Reflection
Statements must be typed.

Portfolio Review

All graduate students will assume full responsibility for
maintaining their portfolios.
In addition, it is the candidate’s
responsibility to make arrangements to meet with his/her advisor
to review the portfolio’s progress.  Portfolios are
reviewed by the advisor in an informal, ongoing manner through
the candidate’s program. Before completion of the program,
portfolios are also reviewed by the candidate’s committee
and a formal defense of the portfolio is made. Graduate candidates
will be recommended for graduation only after they have successfully
defended their portfolio. 

 

Writing the Portfolio

Note: Before beginning this section, please refer to the complete
list of all of the School Counseling Standards including their
Knowledges, Skills, and Dispositions.  The portfolio must
align with these standards.  Take a long look at the standards
and consider how you might perform activities that start you
along the road to beginning attainment of the standards. Each
course at PUC will align with one or more of the standards and
will guide you through the completion of your entries. Also remember
that the candidate must complete entries for the General Standards.

Before beginning to write the portfolio entries, the candidate
must think about what activities from their everyday school life
would be good entries for their portfolio. The PUC program will
provide a series of field experience modules that offer chances
for the candidate to use those activities as entries. For example,
the first entry must align with Standard 1 (Students and the Learning
Process). One of the activities suggested would be to ____________.
The following exercise will help candidates seeking licensure in
school counseling to build their professional portfolio.  Procedures
are described below that will lead to a completed entry for a professional
portfolio (Standard 1).

  • Obtain a file box from a local office supply store.  This
    can be either a metal or plastic   box with room to
    store file folders.
  • Place 10 dividers in the box and label them Standard 1, Standard
    2, etc.
  • Place manila folders in each divider. Be sure to include enough
    to cover all the performances, knowledges, and dispositions in
    the standards.
  • Consider the phases of (include statement for standard 1).
    Think about what activities a school counselor would use to implement
    this process.  Choose one activity that you will develop
    in your school setting.  Examples include: (provide examples)
    Think about the knowledges and dispositions associated with Standard
    1 and discuss those in your narrative section. 
  • Write a reflection about the activity. 
  • Write about how the activity demonstrates your attainment of
    the standard.
  • Place the written material in the folders.

Rubric for Scoring Portfolio Narratives

The Level 5 performance provides clear, compelling, and consistent
evidence of the candidate’s work to demonstrate attainment
of the standard. There is clear and convincing evidence of the
candidate’s professional growth as demonstrated through the
description of the entry, the analysis of its importance, and the
candidate’s reflection on the activity.

All components are tied together and show that the impact of the
activity is relevant and worthwhile, and part of a significant
and meaningful plan for promoting the professional growth of the
candidate and the improvement of the school and/or knowledge and
practice of the education professionals within the school.

The Level 4 performance provides clear and consistent evidence
of the candidate’s work toward the attainment of the standard,
to improve schools, and advance knowledge and practice of education
professionals.  There is clear and convincing evidence of
the candidate’s professional growth as demonstrated through
the description of the artifact, the analysis of the artifact’s
import, and the candidate’s reflection on the impact of the
activity as well as future implications. In any or all of these
areas, a Level 4 performance may show imbalance or unevenness,
but viewed as a whole, the piece provides clear evidence of the
candidate’s professional growth and understanding of the
standard.

The Level 3 performance provides some evidence of the candidate’s
work to improve schools and advance knowledge and practice of education
professionals through her understanding of the standard. Evidence
is present of the candidate’s professional growth as demonstrated
through the description of the artifact, the analysis of its import,
and the candidate’s reflection on the impact of the activity
as well as its import for the future; however, such evidence may
be less convincing, substantial, or significant.  Analysis
and/or reflection may be superficial and lack depth.

The Level 2 performance provides limited evidence of the candidate’s
work to improve schools and advance knowledge and practice of education
professionals through an understanding of the standard.  Evidence
of professional growth is limited. Evidence cited through description
and analysis may be weak or skeletal and/or reflection my be missing
or unrelated to description and analysis.

The Level 1 performance provides little or no evidence of the
candidate’s work to improve schools and advance knowledge
and practice of education professionals through an understanding
of the standard.  There is little or no evidence of the candidate’s
professional growth.  Description, analysis, and reflection
may be unrelated to one another; may be so vague that they lack
meaning; or one or more of these may be missing.

 

Certification in Addictions

Brief Program and Course Descriptions

Only candidates accepted into the certification program or accepted into any program within the Department of Counseling & Development may enroll in these courses. Enrollment is strictly limited to these candidates. These courses must be completed in the order listed below. All ICAADA core functions are covered. This program is ICAADA approved.

The following courses must be completed with a grade of B or better. A grade of C in any one course will be grounds for immediate dismissal from the certification program in addiction counseling.

The abuse of drugs and alcohol has become an international issue, and has now risen to a crisis. There is now greater demand for trained professionals to work in this specialized area. This is an 18 credit hour certificate which will provide a broad foundation and current practice for entry level positions in substance abuse treatment settings, and further understanding and current information for professionals who treat clients with substance abuse diagnosis in private practice and professionals who treat clients with substance abuse issues in schools. Professionals may also use this program to hone, refresh, or upgrade existing knowledge and skills. There is a critical need for trained individuals in mental health centers, school counseling centers, hospitals, and social service agencies.

EDPS 691A:

Theories of Addictions Counseling and Psychopharmacology (3 credit hours/ 45 clock hours): The physiological and psychological aspects of alcohol and other drugs (AOD) use, misuse, and addiction will be explored. AOD treatment modalities will be examined, including delivery of treatment services. General principles and specifics of AODs will be examined and abused substances. The main focus will be upon the actions of various AODs on both the brain and behaviors.

EDPS 691B:

Seminar I: Diversity, HIV/AIDS, and Dual Diagnosis (3 credit hours/45 clock hours)
An examination of cultural systems as they relate to AOD abuse will be examined. The relationship between AOD abuse and HIV/AIDS will be considered in light of current literature. Special attention will be given to the population presenting dual diagnosis, and the treatment and delivery implications for this group.

EDPS 691C:

Seminar II: Ethics, Criminal Justice, and Social Systems (3 credit hours/45 clock hours)
The effects of AOD abuse of society, family, workplace, and criminal justice system will be highlighted. The ethics of counseling individuals with AOD abuse will be emphasized. Ethical dilemmas faced by AOD counselors will be examined.

EDPS 691D:

Recovery and Relapse (3 credit hours/45 clock hours)
The basics of relapse and recovery will be presented. The stages of recovery in treatment and relapse in AOD will be stressed. There will be particular emphasis placed upon withdrawal, myths about recovery and relapse, and the benefits of self-help groups such as AA and NA.

EDPS 691E:

Techniques of Addictions Counseling; Counseling Skills, Groups, and Processes (3 credit hours/45 clock hours)
Basic skills for counseling people with AOD disorders will be understood and practiced. These skills will include various counseling techniques for individual, adolescents, family, and group therapy. Motivational strategies and compliance with treatment will be covered. Assessment, treatment planning, and aftercare will complete the focus.

EDPS 691F:

Practicum (3 credit hours/45 clock hours)
A 220 hour practicum with site supervision and university supervision will provide candidates with supervised, practical experiences in the areas of theory applications, psycopharmacology, ethics, social systems, recovery and relapse, and techniques ion treatment delivery. All of this will demonstrate the candidates mastery of the 12 Core Functions. This is the capstone course.


Measurable Learner Objectives

EDPS 691A: Core Functions; Orientation, Treatment Planning
The candidate will demonstrate:
1. an understanding of the effects of AODs upon brain function,
2. an understanding of the relationship between brain changes and behavior.
3. a knowledge of the definition and recognition of use, misuse, abuse, and addition,
4. a knowledge of current treatment modalities, and
5. a knowledge of the delivery of services for treatment.

EDPS 691B: Core Functions; Intake, Screening Intake
The candidate will demonstrate:
1. an understanding of various cultural systems and the effect of those systems upon AOD addiction,
2. a knowledge of HIV/AIDS, including this disease in relationship to individuals with AOD addiction, and
3. an understanding of dual diagnosis, including assessments, differential diagnosis, and treatment approaches.

EDPS 691C: Core Functions: Orientation, Client Education, Consultation
The candidate will demonstrate:
1. a knowledge of family dynamics as they relate to the addiction,
2. an understanding of the workplace environment in relationship to addiction,
3. a knowledge of th e criminal justice system and its treatment of individuals with addictions and their behaviors,
4. a knowledge of the ethics of addictions’ counseling, and
5. an understanding of ethical dilemmas faced by addictions counselors and agencies.

EDPS 691D: Core Functions: Orientation Referral, Case Management
The candidate will demonstrate:
1. a knowledge of the stages of recovery,
2. an understanding of relapse, including type and frequency issues,
3. a knowledge of the withdrawal process,
4. an understanding of the myths surrounding recovery and relapse, and
5. a knowledge of the dynamics, functioning, and benefits of self-help groups.

EDPS 691E: Core Functions: Assessment Intake, Treatment Planning, Counseling, Report/Record Keeping
The candidate will demonstrate:
1. a knowledge of basic counseling techniques effective in treating individuals, adolescents, families, and groups with AOD addictions,
2. a performance of basic counseling techniques for individuals, families, and groups with AOD addictions,
3. a knowledge of motivational strategies for compliance,
4. a knowledge of assessment tools for AOD addiction,
5. a knowledge of treatment planning, and
6. a knowledge of maintenance strategies.

EDPS 691F: Core Functions; Crisis Management; Client Education, Consultation
The candidate will demonstrate:
1. A performance applying knowledge about psycopharmalogical phenomenon,
2. a performance applying ethical knowledge,
3. a performance applying a knowledge of solving ethical dilemmas,
4. a performance applying a knowledge of societal influences,
5. a performance applying a knowledge of recovery and relapse,
6. a performance applying a knowledge of techniques for therapeutic invention,
7. a performance applying a knowledge of treatment delivery, and
8. all performances completed within the 12 Core Functions.


Format of Instruction

For EDPS 691A through and including E, the format of instruction will be lecture, readings form current literature, discussion, group work, case studies, and videos.

For EDPS 691F, the format of instruction will be supervision, readings from current literature, case conferencing, and treatment issues.


Method of Determining Successful Completion

For EDPS 691A through and including E, candidates will be given formative assessments throughout the semester weighted at 50% of the final grade. At the end of the semester, candidates will be given a cumulative, summative assessment weighted at 50% of the final grade. A final grade of 80% must be achieved, or the candidate will be dismissed from the program.

For EDPS 691F, candidates will be issued formative assessments throughout the semester weighted at 25% of the final grade. There will be a mid-semester assessment by the candidate, the site supervisor, and the university supervisor weighted at 0%. At the end of the semester, candidates will be evaluated by their site supervisor weighted at 35% of the final grade, and university supervisor weighted at 40% of the final grade. A final grade of 80% must be achieved, or the candidate will be dismissed from the program.


Agenda Time Frames

Dependent upon approval by ICAADA, this program would begin every June, and continue as it grows. Courses would be taught as necessary to allow for movement to certification. A new cohort would be interviewed, selected, and begin every June.


Instructors Names and Credentials

The primary instructor and certification chair will be:

Mary J. Didelot, PhD, LMHC, LCAC, NBCCH, LCAC, BCPC

Prof. Didelot has been a professor and counselor in private practice for over 35 years. Her practice includes individuals with addictions, and dually diagnosed individuals, At the university, she is the professor for addictions, including AOD, Eating Disorders, Sexual Addictions, Workaholism, and Gambling. She has lectured internationally and nationally, at both invited and referred programs. She is also well-published nationally and internationally. Dr. Didelot is a member of the American Counseling Association and other professional organizations.

Other instructors will be guest lecturers, as needed, working in the field of addictions who hold at least an MS degree in counseling and are licensed counselors or licensed addictions counselors in the State of Indiana.


Certification in Addiction Counseling

Only candidates accepted into the certification program or any program within the Department of Counseling & Development may enroll in these courses. Enrollment is strictly limited to these programs.

Courses must be taken sequentially.

The following courses must be competed with a grade of B or better. A C in any course is grounds for dismissal from the certification program in addiction counseling.

EDPS 691A:
Theories of Addiction Counseling and Psychopharmacology
3 credit hours/45 clock hours

EDPS 691B:
Seminar I: Diversity, HIV/AIDS, and Dual Diagnosis
3 credit hours/45 clock hours

EDPS 691C:
Seminar II: Ethics, Criminal Justice, and Social Systems
3 credit hours/45 clock hours

EDPS 691D:
Recovery and Relapse
3 credit hours/45 clock hours

EDPS 691E:
Techniques of Addiction Counseling: Counseling Skills, Groups, and Processes
(screening, referrals, and treatment planning)
3 credit hours/45 clock hours

EDPS 691F:
Practicum
3 credit hours/45 clock hours

18 Credit Hours/270


Application

Click here to download the application form in Micorosft Word (DOC)format.

If you experience any trouble filling out or accessing the form, please contact Dr. Didelot at didelot@purduecal.edu.

Counseling and Development Handbook

The Counseling and Development Handbook is a comprehensive document discussing all of our programs in detail. It is suitable for printing if so desired.

Counseling and Development Handbook (Adobe PDF)

Admission Deadlines

The deadline for admission to all programs has been extended to Monday, February 24th. 

School Counseling:  We are now admitting students to the School Counseling Program twice a year:  Fall Semester and Spring Semester. Submit all application materials to Gyte Annex 142 no later than the 2nd Monday in February for admission to the following fall cohort, and the 1st Monday in October for a spring admission.

Mental Health and Human Services:  Applications and materials for the Mental Health Counseling Program and Human Services Program are accepted the 1st Monday in October during Fall Semester the 2nd Monday in February during the Spring Semester. Submit all application materials to Gyte Annex 142.

Addictions Certificate: Applications are accepted every semester for this certificate program.  It is open to graduate and undergraduate students.  Please contact Dr. Didelot about this program at didelot@purduecal.edu.

Standards and Guiding Principles -
Counseling Programs

Mission

The mission of the Purdue
University Calumet School Counseling and Mental Health Counseling
Programs is to prepare candidates who will empower all students
and clients to reach their maximum potential in the areas of
academic, personal, social, and career development. In doing
so, candidates graduating from these programs with be ethically
and culturally competent educational and community leaders who
address individual and systemic barriers to academic achievement
and personal development.

Overall Program Objectives

These general objectives address our goals for students in all of our programs.

  1. Leadership and Advocacy: To prepare students to be able to provide competent professional service and leadership within the mental health or school counseling field upon graduation; to be able to demonstrate a broad range of professional competencies relevant to the professional practice of mental health or school counseling (e.g., advocacy, counseling, consulting, professional development, leading, managing, and supervising); and to be able to act as advocates for those individuals and families to whom they provide services.
  2. Diversity: To prepare student to be able to demonstrate knowledge of and respect for the influence of culture, ethnicity, gender, race, sexual orientation, religion, ability, and socioeconomic class in counseling individuals from diverse populations; to be able to maintain a multicultural and global perspective, emphasizing social justice for all; demonstrate competency in implementing culturally appropriate counseling techniques of assessment, intervention, and intervention evaluation with diverse clients; and to be able to demonstrate the ability to practice in a manner consistent with a fundamental belief that all individuals have the capacity to grow, change and learn.
  3. Collaboration: To prepare students to be able to interact with a full spectrum of mental health or school counseling professionals; to be able to collaborate skillfully and respectfully as leaders, consultants, and team leaders in a variety of settings; and to exhibit sensitive and mature personal relationships in professional interactions.
  4. Programming: To prepare students to be able to develop programming that integrates theories of human behavior and human development and who possess a general knowledge of and experience with treatment modalities appropriate for a broad range of mental health service recipients and mental health service settings.
  5. Research: To prepare students to be able to demonstrate competency in evaluating research and applying it to counseling; to be able to bridge theory and research into practice; and to be able to determine the appropriate methods of research design and analysis when addressing professional research issues.
  6. Ethics/Professional Identity: To prepare students to be able to model and engage in behaviors consistent with the legal and ethical standards of the counseling profession; who can successfully establish a professional identity as mental health or school counselors; to think critically and engage in reflective, ethical, and legal practice throughout their education and their professional lives; to pursue lifelong professional and personal development through continuing education, counseling, and participation and leadership in professional organizations; and to demonstrate competency in personal and career counseling with individuals and groups.

Philosophy

The counselor education faculty
understands counseling to be a continuous learning-oriented supportive
process involving interpersonal relationships between a counselor
and one or more clients carried on in a controlled social environment.
The aim of counseling is to explore the clients’ perceptions
of themselves and their environment, to enable them to see how
they can utilize their personal resources for growth, to help
them learn to take responsibility for their thoughts, feelings
and behavior, and to be advocates for change in clients’ environments.
The outcome is for clients to take constructive action on their
own behalf. We believe the role of the counselor should be that
of a human relations specialist within the school or social agency.
This role implies a commitment on the part of counselors to act
within their work and social environments as agents for constructive
change of attitudes and practices, which demean or oppress individuals
or groups.In order to establish and implement a quality educational
program that is in accord with these basic beliefs and purposes,
appropriate assumptions have been identified from which specific
objectives may be stated. These assumptions are as follows:

  1. Preparation as a counselor should include a mixture of didactic
    and experiential activities. These components of the program
    should be presented in such a way that their relevance to counseling
    effectiveness might readily be previewed by students.
  2. Opportunities should be provided for counselor candidates to
    participate in group and individual counseling. We believe that
    self-understanding contributes to personal and professional maturity
    as well as to the capacity for good judgment. Who the counselor
    is as a person (i.e. her/his interpersonal warmth, sensitivity,
    acceptance, values, ethics, and ways of relating to others) is
    perceived as being as essential to effective counseling as what
    the counselor knows or has achieved. Furthermore, we believe
    it is vital to the congruency and integrity of counselors that
    they do not perceive themselves as being above the very process
    they use to help others grow. Consequently, participation in
    various counseling opportunities to examine personal values,
    traits, strengths, defenses, stresses, needs and ways of relating
    to others is essential. Counselor candidates should be committed
    to such self-exploration throughout their program and their career
    as a counselor. Candidates should indicate their acceptance of
    the importance of this aspect of the program prior to applying
    for formal admission.
  3. A basic emphasis of the training program should be on self-evaluation
    by the student on both academic and personal levels. The assumption
    is that a meaningful program of counselor education must facilitate
    this process, provide opportunities for periodic evaluation,
    and include appropriate alternatives for those choosing not to
    continue in the program.
  4. Interaction between students, between faculty, and between
    students and faculty should be encouraged and facilitated. Through
    such interaction channels of communication are opened, concepts
    are crystallized and personal and program growth is facilitated.
  5. Since a number of reputable approaches to the conceptualization
    and treatment of client concerns have been developed, no one
    theoretical approach should be imposed upon students. Rather,
    certain theoretical knowledge relevant to development of individual
    counseling styles is essential.

Important Things to Know About Our Program and Your New Profession

If you are admitted: You are entering a unique field of study;
it is unlike many other graduate degrees. A Master’s in counseling
is considered a terminal professional degree that requires specific
areas of training to assure you are competent to practice when
you graduate. You will literally have people’s well-being
in your hands at times, so the training you receive is crucial
to your competency as a counselor. Consequently, our program involves
a rigorous sequence of courses. To be successful in our program,
you are required to attend classes regularly and to arrive on time
for classes. As professional counselors, your professors are ethically
responsible to serve as gatekeepers of our field. We are dedicated
to training competent, ethical, and knowledgeable counselors. We
expect the same commitment from our students.

Many of our courses
are work and time intensive to prepare you for the counseling field.
Our courses require you to be actively involved. Much of what you
learn will be not just from your textbooks, but also from the didactic
instruction, supervision from your professors, and discussion and
experiential classroom activities with you peers. If you miss two
classes in a row, you may be withdrawn from a course. Each class
also has its own attendance policy that can affect your grade.
This is not meant to be punitive, but rather to prepare you to
step into the role of a responsible, professional counselor. If
you are admitted into a counseling program, it is important for
you to know that if you earn a “C” or lower in two
courses, you will be withdrawn from the program.

This information
is not meant to heighten your anxiety or to be punitive, but rather
to provide you with a realistic view of what is required of you
in this program. Professional counseling is a truly rewarding field
if you successfully commit to the training needed to work effectively
with clients and students and you are able to graduate from our
program feeling confident about your skills as a professional counselor.


The Mission of the School
of Education

The mission of Purdue University Calumet’s
School of Education, in collaboration with other professional
educators and agencies, is to prepare and support education professionals
and related specialists who:

  • Apply the appropriate knowledge, dispositions, and performances
    in developing diverse approaches to educational strategies that
    are constructive, consistent and reflective of sound practice;
  • Are prepared to use current research, knowledge, and technology
    to empower the people they serve;
  • Are sensitive and responsive to the unique needs of themselves,
    of others, and of the diverse society in which they practice;
  • Are advocates for and models of quality education and lifelong
    learning.

The School of Education faculty is committed to providing the
human and technological resources to enable students and themselves
to develop as educational professionals in constructing knowledge,
developing practice, and fostering relationships.

Conceptual Framework

“Constructing
knowledge”
refers
to the process by which individuals make meaning of professional
information and develop personal theories about teaching, learning
and human development.  Individuals construct knowledge through
structured educational activities and life experiences.

“Developing
practice”
refers
to both the process by which education professionals improve how
they do their job as well as to the process of developing and growing
as reflective professional practitioners.

“Fostering
relationships”
refers
to the development of those dispositions necessary to create mutually
beneficial connections among people and educational institutions
and organizations.


General Graduate Studies in Education Standards

Each program has adopted its own set of standards. In addition,
the Department of Graduate Studies also implements a set of general
standards, whose attainment is required by all candidates.

GSE 1: Instructional Uses of
Technology

“The graduate understands the central
concepts related to educational technology, and can effectively
and appropriately implement this technology into classroom
preparation and instruction”

GSE 2: Individuals with Special
Needs

“The graduate understands various
learning and physical disabilities, how these may be
manifested in learning situations, and how to adapt instruction
to ensure success for all individuals.”

GSE 3: Diversity

“The graduate understands the nature
of diversity in the human community, how cultural and
gender differences can affect learning, and how to create
a learning environment that protects the individuality
and dignity of all learners.”

GSE 4: Communication

“The graduate uses knowledge of
appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and written communication
in preparing instructional materials and can effectively
communicate with all stakeholders within the professional
community.”

GSE 5: Educational Research

“The graduate understands current
trends in educational research and can critically examine
this research in relationship to his/her profession.”

GSE 6: Community Collaboration

“The graduate understands the
dynamics of educational, geographic, and/or school communities;
can effectively participate within these communities; and
fosters an environment that respects all individuals.”

GSE 7: Content Knowledge

“The graduate understands that professional decisions
must be made based on a thorough knowledge foundation
that includes theories, skills, organizational structures  and
cultures, societal  needs, legal foundations, learning
theory, research techniques, and many others. This solid
knowledge base will result in a decision-making process
that is reasoned, accurate, and competent.”

 

Professional Ethics

The Counseling and Development
faculty have adopted the ethical standards of the American Counseling
Association, the American Psychological Association, and the American
School Counselor Association as the ethical codes governing the
professional behavior of students and faculty members. It is acknowledged
that students are in preparation to become helping professionals;
nevertheless, the faculty expects students, particularly in their
client contacts, field practice assignments, research activities
and other experiences involving contact with the public, to conduct
their work in accord with all standards set forth by these ethical
codes. Failure to do so can bring faculty censure of the student
and/or expulsion from the program.Students are encouraged to seek
student membership in the American Counseling Association (ACA).
ACA offers many benefits and services including a newsletter and
professional journals. In addition, ACA offers professional liability
insurance for student members at a reduced rate. Liability insurance
is required for those students going into mental health counseling.
Information may be obtained by calling the ACA at 800-347-6647.
Membership applications are available from the ACA website: www.counseling.org.

Professional Affiliations

We also encourage students to become
members in the organizations that represent their chosen field.
For those in the school counseling program, it is advisable to
join the American School Counselor Association (ASCA). For those
students in the mental health program, it is advisable to join
the American Mental Health Counselors Association (AMHCA).  Membership in the
American Counseling Association is highly recommended.

Valuing Diversity

The
counseling profession is bound to the values of its governing organization
(the American Counseling Association) and to those of the social
sciences in which it belongs. These values include the importance
of creating an interpersonal environment that is safe and accepting,
with emphasis on the importance of counseling students and professionals
being non-discriminatory and respectful of diverse people. The
expectation of the Purdue Calumet Counseling Program, then, is
that students will incorporate these values by being supportive
and respectful of all individuals, with particular attention to
those who are different from themselves in terms of race, ethnicity,
gender, language, special needs, sexual orientation, religion,
socioeconomic status, and geography. This expectation is in line
with the School of Education’s position on diversity (please visit
that website at http://www.tommihail.net/diversity.html).

Possessing
a nondiscriminatory attitude is not only expected but is to be
exceeded. The program is interested in individuals who will be
actively observant and introspective of their own attitudes and
behavior, and when confronted with their own prejudices will work
to understand their underlying beliefs and feelings and take steps
toward changing them. Enrollment in this program is therefore seen
as a commitment to the values of accepting and psychologically
protecting all people, and to life-long scrutiny and self-examination.
A deepening of this commitment is essential. Our faculty is committed
to supporting the constructive personal development of all enrolled
students, but will not support behavior or expressions, which are
judged to be highly intolerant and/or rigid. Prospective students
should understand that their displayed levels of acceptance of
others in all the areas listed above will be used to evaluate their
readiness for or progress during their counseling program. We trust
that students who are ready for and excited about becoming skilled,
highly competent counseling professionals will eagerly join us
in this commitment to respect for diversity.

Forms and Application Materials
– Counseling Programs

The School Counseling Standards and available
program forms may be found by clicking the links to the right.

Note that some files are in the PDF format; to
view them, you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your
computer.

Click here
to download Acrobat Reader.


Application Checklist for Counseling Programs (PDF)

Online Application to the Graduate School

Special Supplement for Application to the Counseling Programs (PDF)

Official Transcript Request Form (PDF)

Letter of Recommendation Form (PDF)

Remediation, Retention, and Dismissal Policy (PDF)

Professional Counseling Performance Evaluation (PCPE) (PDF)

Purdue University Calumet Policies (PDF)

School Counseling Standards

Gates for Assessment (PDF)

New!Certification in Addictions – Application (PDF)

New!Certification in Addictions – Letter of Recommendation Form (PDF)


Tips to Make The Application Process Go Smoothly

Once you are admitted to a program, an understanding of administrative
procedures will make your experience more enjoyable and positive.  The
following, therefore, are tips that will help you find your way
through the bureaucracy and finish your program in a timely and
successful manner.

  1. All of our graduate programs are housed in the Graduate Studies
    in Education (GSE) office. We are located in the GYTE Annex,
    Room 142, and our phone number is 219-989-2326. The office personnel
    are Virginia Rhodes, secretary and Dr. Robert Colon, GSE Department Head.
  2. During the admissions process, please check with Virginia regularly to make certain that necessary paperwork is completed
    on time.  Your
    admission to a program will not occur until all of the required
    materials are received.  It is your responsibility to make
    certain that all necessary documents are requested and sent to
    our office.
      You can save yourself much time and trouble
    by being conscientious in the gathering of required documentation.
  3. Once you are admitted, you must register for classes.  PUC
    allows registration online.  However, you cannot register
    for courses in GSE programs without permission from your advisor.  It
    is important, therefore, to find out when registration begins
    each semester, see your advisor about appropriate coursework,
    and register in a timely fashion.  Failure to get your advisor’s
    permission may result in your being dropped from a class for
    which you registered.  Because of state and federal requirements,
    it is necessary for us to sequence our programs and supervise
    enrollment carefully.  Please do not cause difficulties
    for yourself by omitting this most important step.  Registration
    dates are posted on calendars located all over campus, including
    our GSE office.
  4. Another necessary step towards completion of your graduate
    program is the Plan of Study (POS).  It is a contract
    between you and your advisor establishing the specific program
    that you will complete.  Once the POS is signed, even if
    the program changes, you will not be required to make any modifications
    of your course of study.  The window of opportunity
    for completing a POS is from the time you are admitted (and any
    conditions of admission are completed) until the semester before
    you intend to graduate.  During this window, it is your
    responsibility to contact your advisor and request that a POS
    be completed.  Again, please heed this reminder so that
    you do not delay your graduation.

 

Certified Background Check Information

Any student accepted into a Counseling & Development program is required to have an Expanded Criminal History Report on file with our Field Experience Coordinator, Bonnie Colon. These programs include: Clinical Mental Health Counseling, School Counseling, Human Services, and the Certificate in Addictions. These reports need to be completed within the first week of class.

Students should follow the link below to Certified Background website and apply as a Student.

Certified Background website:
http://www.CertifiedBackground.com

Download the instructions for registration here (Adobe PDF), or continue reading below. The cost of the report is $28 and needs to be paid with a credit card.
When you register you will either choose:

PU39–Background Check
PU39re – Recheck Background Check

You will then be directed to set up your CertifiedProfile account.

Order Summary:
Required Personal Information

  1. In addition to entering your full name and date of birth, you will be asked for your Social Security Number, current address, phone number and e-mail address.
  2. Payment Information: At the end of the online order process, you will be prompted to enter your Visa or MasterCard information. Money orders are also accepted but will result in a $10 fee and an additional turn-around-time.

View Your Results:

Your results will be posted directly to your CertifiedProfile account. You will be notified if there is any missing information needed inorder to process your order. Although 95% of background check results are completed within 3-5 business days, some results maytake longer. Your order will show as “In Process” until it has been completed in its entirety. Your school’s administrator can alsosecurely view your results online with their unique username and password.

If you have any additional questions, please contact Student Support at 888-914-7279 or email studentservices@certifiedprofile.com

Please be advised that any convictions disclosed on your criminal history report may result in the inability to be licensed as mental health counselor, school counselor, and/or counselor in addictions.

Students will receive a confirmation page when the report is requested.  One copy should be submitted to the Field Office and the student should keep one for his/her records.