Research Papers

Statistical Analysis of the Effect of Temperature on RFID Tag Readability

The use of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology in packaging industry has gained popularity in the past few years. The performance of RFID tags in such environments is dependent on the type of products, speed of conveyor, tag position etc. The effect of temperature on the RFID tag readability has not been investigated fully in an application specific environment. This paper investigates the effect of temperature variation on tag readability of the packaged product. A relationship has been developed using factorial design to understand the influence of temperature and other critical factors and their interaction effects on the RFID tag readability.

For further information please contact:

Gokarna R. Aryal, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Statistics
Department of Mathematics, CS and Statistics
Purdue University Calumet
2200 169th Street
Hammond, IN 46323
Office: Classroom Office Building, CLO 360
Office phone: (219) 989-2701

aryalg@calumet.purdue.edu

Lash Mapa,Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering Technology
Phone:219-989-2574
mapa@calumet.purdue.edu
Office:ANDR234

Integration of Vision Technology and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) in a Manufacturing Environment

Machine-vision programs are used as a tool in the chain of events prior to a final decision or used to make a final decision. A typical example would be an application involving explicitly defined single-variable pass-fail criteria where the task is to check several critical quality characteristics of an item and reject it if any of the characteristics is out of compliance. RFID systems that have interrogators (readers) are placed on manufacturing lines and conveyor lines to control and verify inventory accuracy. The read-write capability of tags on the item could be programmed to indicate the status and this feature could be used to write real-time information such as operation summary, data on critical quality characteristics and final decision on pass-fail information on the chip of the tag. The tag will then become a permanent record of the item and its history along the supply chain and information retrieval by other parties becomes possible. This paper describes a system that has been developed to integrate the vision assisted fault diagnosis to continuously monitor items and record critical characteristics associated with it that can be retrieved, on a RFID tag.

For further information please contact:

Lash Mapa,Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering Technology
Phone:219-989-2574
mapa@calumet.purdue.edu
Office:ANDR234